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Informing active play and screen time behaviour change interventions for low socioeconomic position mothers of young children: what do mothers want?

Downing, Katherine L., Best, Keren, Campbell, Karen J. and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2016, Informing active play and screen time behaviour change interventions for low socioeconomic position mothers of young children: what do mothers want?, BioMed research international, vol. 2016, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1155/2016/2139782.

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Title Informing active play and screen time behaviour change interventions for low socioeconomic position mothers of young children: what do mothers want?
Author(s) Downing, Katherine L.
Best, Keren
Campbell, Karen J.
Hesketh, Kylie D.
Journal name BioMed research international
Volume number 2016
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Hindawi
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2314-6141
Keyword(s) Adult
Child
Child Care
Child, Preschool
Communication
Female
Humans
Internet
Mothers
Parenting
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
AGED 0-4 YEARS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
HEALTH
TRIAL
Summary Introduction. This study investigated views of mothers from disadvantaged urban and regional areas (i.e., beyond major capital cities) as potential end users of child active play and screen time behaviour change interventions, with a focus on text messaging and web-based delivery platforms.

Methods. Thirty-two mothers (22 urban; 10 regional) were interviewed. Purpose-designed questions covered topics regarding mothers' preferences for accessing and receiving information related to parenting and child active play and screen time. Data from transcribed interviews were analysed to identify responses and key themes.

Results.
Mothers reported frequently accessing parenting- and child-related information online. Regional mothers reported seeking information by talking with other people less frequently than urban mothers and seemed to have a stronger preference for receiving information online. There were few differences between responses from low and high educated mothers. The majority of mothers reported that they would be happy to receive text messages containing information about active play and screen time and that they would find a dedicated website with this information useful.

Conclusions.
Mothers in this study held favourable views on the potential of receiving information via new communication technologies. Future interventions targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers may benefit from delivering intervention messages via these technologies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2016/2139782
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Katherine L. Downing et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091136

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.