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Biophilia in urban design: patterns and principles for smart Australian cities

Downton, Paul, Jones, David and Zeunert, Joshua 2016, Biophilia in urban design: patterns and principles for smart Australian cities, in IUDC 2016: Smart Cities for 21st Century Australia : Proceedings of the 9th International Urban Design Conference 2016, Association for Sustainability in Business, Nerang, QLD, pp. 168-182.

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Title Biophilia in urban design: patterns and principles for smart Australian cities
Author(s) Downton, Paul
Jones, David
Zeunert, Joshua
Conference name International Urban Design. Conference (9th : 2016 : Canberra, ACT)
Conference location Canberra, ACT
Conference dates 7-9 Nov. 2016
Title of proceedings IUDC 2016: Smart Cities for 21st Century Australia : Proceedings of the 9th International Urban Design Conference 2016
Editor(s) Beza, Beau
Jones, David
Publication date 2016
Conference series International Urban Design Conference
Start page 168
End page 182
Total pages 15
Publisher Association for Sustainability in Business
Place of publication Nerang, QLD
Keyword(s) biophilia
biophilic design
Australian cities
Summary In the three decades or more since EO Wilson’s Biophilia (1984) hypothesis was introduced to the scientific lexicon it has become widely accepted as a powerful way of understanding and examining the bond that humans have with other species and living systems, which Wilson suggests is fundamentally instinctive. The hypothesis has been advanced and incorporated in the concept of Biophilic Design promoted by Kellert et al (2008) and further interpreted and celebrated by Newman (2012) and others, particularly Beatley in Biophilic Cities (2010). Biophilic design has been codified for commercial and professional acceptance, notably by Terrapin Bright Green LLC (Browning et al 2014) with 14 Patterns of Biophilic Design (2014), and there is increasing applied exploration and acceptance of the hypothesis in Australian planning and design applications. This paper considers the position and adoption of biophilic urban design in Australia, identifies biophilic patterns and principles found in extant and proposed examples of Australian urban design, with reference to relevant international case studies, and explores the relevance of those patterns and principles to the development of smart cities.
ISBN 9781922232526
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2016, Association for Sustainability in Business
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091162

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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