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Biophilic design applications: theory and patterns into built environment education

Downton, Paul, Jones, David, Zeunert, Joshua and Roos, Phillip 2017, Biophilic design applications: theory and patterns into built environment education, in DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology, Knowledge E, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, pp. 59-65, doi: 10.18502/keg.v2i2.596.

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Title Biophilic design applications: theory and patterns into built environment education
Author(s) Downton, Paul
Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Zeunert, Joshua
Roos, PhillipORCID iD for Roos, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-5571-1059
Conference name Design and Technology. International Conference (2016 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 5-8 Dec. 2016
Title of proceedings DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology
Editor(s) Collins, P.
Gibson, I.
Publication date 2017
Conference series Design and Technology International Conference
Start page 59
End page 65
Total pages 6
Publisher Knowledge E
Place of publication Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Keyword(s) biophilia
biophilic design
built environment practice
Summary In 1984 E.O. Wilson (1984) introduced and popularized the Biophilia hypothesis defining biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life" (Kellert & Wilson 1995: 416). Wilson’s biophilia hypothesis suggests that there is an instinctive bond between human beings and other living systems. More recently, in the USA, Browning et al (2014) have proposed ‘14 Patterns of Biophilic Design’ within a framework for linking the human biological sciences and nature to built environment design offering a series of tools for enriching design opportunities, and avenues for design applications as a way to effectively enhance the health and well-being of individuals and society. While biophilia is the theory, biophilic design as advocated by Kellert et al (2008) and Beatley (2010) internationally offers a sustainable design strategy that seeks to reconnect people with the ‘natural environment’. Overall, from what little research has been undertaken internationally in the last 10 years, there is a solid understanding as to the applied application of this theory, its principles and processes to built environment design and no research about to how to retrofit the existing urban fabric using this approach. This paper reviews the application of biophilic design in Australia, including the scope of design, health and wellbeing literature, the ‘14 Patterns of Biophilic Design’ and performative measures now unfolding, brings forward a new Biophilic Design Pattern, and considers the value the approach offers to built environment practice as well as to human and non-human occupants.
ISSN 2518-6841
Language eng
DOI 10.18502/keg.v2i2.596
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091164

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.