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Towards recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: quality of life outcomes, stage-sensitive treatments, and mindfulness mechanisms

Murray, Greg, Leitan, Nuwan, Thomas, Neil, Michalak, Erin E., Johnson, Sheri L., Jones, Steven, Perich, Tania, Berk, Lesley and Berk, Michael 2017, Towards recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: quality of life outcomes, stage-sensitive treatments, and mindfulness mechanisms, Clinical psychology review, vol. 52, pp. 148-163, doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.01.002.

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Title Towards recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: quality of life outcomes, stage-sensitive treatments, and mindfulness mechanisms
Author(s) Murray, Greg
Leitan, Nuwan
Thomas, Neil
Michalak, Erin E.
Johnson, Sheri L.
Jones, Steven
Perich, Tania
Berk, LesleyORCID iD for Berk, Lesley orcid.org/0000-0002-3677-7503
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name Clinical psychology review
Volume number 52
Start page 148
End page 163
Total pages 16
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 0272-7358
1873-7811
Keyword(s) bipolar disorder
depression
mania
mindfulness
psychotherapy
quality of life
recovery
staging
Summary Current adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder (BD) aim to impact illness course via information sharing/skill development. This focus on clinical outcomes contrasts with the emergent recovery paradigm, which prioritises adaptation to serious mental illness and movement towards personally meaningful goals. The aim of this review is to encourage innovation in the psychological management of BD by considering three recovery-oriented trends in the literature. First, the importance of quality of life as a target of recovery-oriented clinical work is considered. Second, the recent staging approach to BD is described, and we outline implications for psychosocial interventions tailored to stage. Finally, we review evidence suggesting that mindfulness-based psychosocial interventions have potential across early, middle and late stages of BD. It is concluded that the humanistic emphasis of the recovery paradigm provides a timely stimulus for development of a next generation of psychosocial treatments for people with BD.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.01.002
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091207

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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