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Development and evaluation of an on-ride motorcycle coaching program in Victoria: how well was VicRide implemented and received by the target novice motorcycle riders?

Sakashita, Chika, Ivers, Rebecca, Senserrick, Teresa, Lo, Serigne, de Rome, Liz, Elkingtone, Jane and Boufous, Soufiane 2015, Development and evaluation of an on-ride motorcycle coaching program in Victoria: how well was VicRide implemented and received by the target novice motorcycle riders?, in ARSC 2015 : Proceedings of the Australasian Road Safety Conference, Australasian College of Road Safety, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 1-10.

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Title Development and evaluation of an on-ride motorcycle coaching program in Victoria: how well was VicRide implemented and received by the target novice motorcycle riders?
Author(s) Sakashita, Chika
Ivers, Rebecca
Senserrick, Teresa
Lo, Serigne
de Rome, LizORCID iD for de Rome, Liz orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-6022
Elkingtone, Jane
Boufous, Soufiane
Conference name Australasian Road Safety. Conference (2015 : Gold Coast, Queensland)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 14-16 Oct. 2015
Title of proceedings ARSC 2015 : Proceedings of the Australasian Road Safety Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2015
Conference series Australasian Road Safety Conference
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Australasian College of Road Safety
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Summary VicRoads initiated a large-scale trial of a newly developed ‘VicRide on-road coaching program’ forrecently licensed motorcyclists in Victoria. The George Institute for Global Health wascommissioned to evaluate VicRide primarily to determine its effectiveness in reducing crash ratesfor the target group via a randomised control trial. A process evaluation was also conducted toexamine program delivery in parallel with the outcome evaluation. The objective of this paper is topresent the process evaluation results. Data were sourced from the coaches, the program deliveryorganisation, and VicRide participants. Willingness to pay for VicRide was also obtained from thetarget novice motorcyclists. Overall the results suggest that VicRide was delivered as intended bythe design on most aspects. However, the trial also identified numerous barriers to achieve highcompletion rates for both the preparation activity and program attendance and VicRide as a roadsafety intervention was valued significantly less by program participants than control riders whohad not yet completed the program. Though the low completion rates may have negatively impactedthe program outcomes, the barriers to completion may also reflect that individualised programs suchas VicRide are practically challenging to standardise and implement as a state-wide intervention.These may be improved if all learning opportunities are contained within program attendance andthe program is made mandatory. Nevertheless, these considerations are meaningful only if andwhen VicRide and other similar programs demonstrate detectable road safety value including crashand casualty reductions, reduced risk taking behaviours and improved safety attitudes.
Language eng
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©[2015, The Conference]
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091248

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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