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The Pedal Study: characteristics of bicycle crashes in different cycling environments

de Rome, L., Boufous, Soufiane, Gregerson, Tom, Senserrick, Teresa, Richardson, Drew and Ivers, Rebecca 2012, The Pedal Study: characteristics of bicycle crashes in different cycling environments, in ACRS 2012 : A Safe System: Expanding the Reach : Proceedings of the Australasian College of Road Safety National Conference, Australasian College of Road Safety, Mawson, A.C.T., pp. 1-16.

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Title The Pedal Study: characteristics of bicycle crashes in different cycling environments
Author(s) de Rome, L.ORCID iD for de Rome, L. orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-6022
Boufous, Soufiane
Gregerson, Tom
Senserrick, Teresa
Richardson, Drew
Ivers, Rebecca
Conference name Australian College of Road Safety. National Conference (2012 : Sudney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 9-10 Aug. 2012
Title of proceedings ACRS 2012 : A Safe System: Expanding the Reach : Proceedings of the Australasian College of Road Safety National Conference
Publication date 2012
Conference series Australian College of Road Safety National Conference
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Australasian College of Road Safety
Place of publication Mawson, A.C.T.
Keyword(s) bicycle
cyclist
injury
disability
injury prevention
post-crash
non-fatal crashes
road crash injury
return to work
Summary Introduction & methods: This study examined the burden of injury and characteristics of bicycle crashes in different cycling environments. A cross sectional survey of 202 adults (aged 17-70 years) who presented to hospital with a transport-related cycling crash injuries over the six months from November, 2009. Data was obtained from participant interviews and medical records.Results: Participants included 79 (39.1%) who had been cycling in traffic, 16 (7.9%) in bicycle lanes, 73 (36.1%) on shared paths and 34 (16.8%) on footpaths or other pedestrian areas. Over half (52%) were single vehicle crashes without involvement of other road users, 20.8% involved motor vehicles, 18.8% involved other bicycles, 6.4% involved pedestrians and 2.0% involved animals. While 58.4% of cyclists sustained minor injuries (AIS 1), 36.1% had moderately severe injuries (AIS 2) and 5.4% were seriously injured (AIS 3+). Crashes in bicycle lanes were less severe than those in other cycling environments. The mean injury severity score (ISS) was highest for cyclists who crashed on shared paths (4.4) and in traffic (4.0). The majority of crashes involving another vehicle occurred in traffic (58.8%), shared paths (22.5%) and bicycle lanes (12.5%). The other vehicle was almost equally as likely to be another bicycle as a motor vehicle (47.5% versus 52.5%). The estimated average travelling speed of cyclists prior to a multi-vehicle crashes was 25.3km/h. Average reported speeds were highest for cyclists in traffic (28.7km/h) and bicycle lanes and lowest on footpaths (10.9km/h). The average speed on shared paths was 20.9km/h with a maximum of 43km/h. Conclusions: This study confirms the value of on-road lanes reserved exclusively for cyclists as a means of reducing their crash and injury rates but raises questions as to the safety of cycling on shared paths and pedestrian areas. Suggestions are made for increased regulation of cycling in areas shared with pedestrians.
Language eng
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category EN.1 Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©[2012, The Conference]
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091267

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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