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How do great bowerbirds construct perspective illusions?

Kelley, Laura A. and Endler, John A. 2017, How do great bowerbirds construct perspective illusions?, Royal society open science, vol. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1098/rsos.160661.

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Title How do great bowerbirds construct perspective illusions?
Author(s) Kelley, Laura A.
Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Journal name Royal society open science
Volume number 4
Article ID 160661
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 2054-5703
Keyword(s) bowerbird
construction behaviour
forced perspective
Summary Many animals build structures to provide shelter, avoid predation, attract mates or house offspring, but the behaviour and potential cognitive processes involved during building are poorly understood. Great bowerbird (Ptilinorhynchus nuchalis) males build and maintain display courts by placing tens to hundreds of objects in a positive size-distance gradient. The visual angles created by the gradient create a forced perspective illusion that females can use to choose a mate. Although the quality of illusion is consistent within males, it varies among males, which may reflect differences in how individuals reconstruct their courts. We moved all objects off display courts to determine how males reconstructed the visual illusion. We found that all individuals rapidly created the positive size-distance gradient required for forced perspective within the first 10 objects placed. Males began court reconstruction by placing objects in the centre of the court and then placing objects further out, a technique commonly used when humans lay mosaics. The number of objects present after 72 h was not related to mating success or the quality of the illusion, indicating that male skill at arranging objects rather than absolute number of objects appears to be important. We conclude that differences arise in the quality of forced perspective illusions despite males using the same technique to reconstruct their courts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rsos.160661
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
060807 Animal Structure and Function
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091286

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.