You are not logged in.

Case study and case-based research in emergency nursing and care: theoretical foundations and practical application in paramedic pre-hospital clinical judgment and decision-making of patients with mental illness

Shaban, Ramon Z, Considine, Julie, Fry, Margaret and Curtis, Kate 2017, Case study and case-based research in emergency nursing and care: theoretical foundations and practical application in paramedic pre-hospital clinical judgment and decision-making of patients with mental illness, Australasian emergency nursing journal, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 17-24, doi: 10.1016/j.aenj.2017.01.002.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Case study and case-based research in emergency nursing and care: theoretical foundations and practical application in paramedic pre-hospital clinical judgment and decision-making of patients with mental illness
Author(s) Shaban, Ramon Z
Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Fry, Margaret
Curtis, Kate
Journal name Australasian emergency nursing journal
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Start page 17
End page 24
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-02
ISSN 1574-6267
Keyword(s) ambulance
case
case study
clinical judgment
emergency
mental illness
paramedic
pre-hospital
reasoning
research
case-control studies
decision making
emergency medical technicians
emergency nursing
health services research
humans
judgment
mental disorders
Summary Generating knowledge through quality research is fundamental to the advancement of professional practice in emergency nursing and care. There are multiple paradigms, designs and methods available to researchers to respond to challenges in clinical practice. Systematic reviews, randomised control trials and other forms of experimental research are deemed the gold standard of evidence, but there are comparatively few such trials in emergency care. In some instances it is not possible or appropriate to undertake experimental research. When exploring new or emerging problems where there is limited evidence available, non-experimental methods are required and appropriate. This paper provides the theoretical foundations and an exemplar of the use of case study and case-based research to explore a new and emerging problem in the context of emergency care. It examines pre-hospital clinical judgement and decision-making of mental illness by paramedics. Using an exemplar the paper explores the theoretical foundations and conceptual frameworks of case study, it explains how cases are defined and the role researcher in this form of inquiry, it details important principles and the procedures for data gathering and analysis, and it demonstrates techniques to enhance trustworthiness and credibility of the research. Moreover, it provides theoretically and practical insights into using case study in emergency care.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aenj.2017.01.002
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, College of Emergency Nursing Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091288

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Centre for Quality and Patient Safety
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 35 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Feb 2017, 07:42:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.