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Do maternal perceptions of child eating and feeding help to explain the disconnect between reported and observed feeding practices?: A follow-up study

Bergmeier, Heidi J, Skouteris, Helen, Hetherington, Marion M, Rodgers, Rachel F, Campbell, Karen J and Cox, Rachael 2017, Do maternal perceptions of child eating and feeding help to explain the disconnect between reported and observed feeding practices?: A follow-up study, Maternal and child nutrition, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1111/mcn.12420.

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Title Do maternal perceptions of child eating and feeding help to explain the disconnect between reported and observed feeding practices?: A follow-up study
Author(s) Bergmeier, Heidi J
Skouteris, Helen
Hetherington, Marion M
Rodgers, Rachel F
Campbell, Karen JORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Cox, Rachael
Journal name Maternal and child nutrition
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-02-08
ISSN 1740-8695
1740-8709
Keyword(s) childhood obesity
feeding practices
maternal perceptions
mealtime interactions
preschoolers
Summary Research demonstrates a mismatch between reported and observed maternal feeding practices. This mismatch may be explained by maternal cognitions, attitudes, and motivations relating to dyadic parent-child feeding interactions. These complex constructs may not be apparent during observations nor evidenced in self-report questionnaire. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a qualitative approach to gain a more nuanced and contextualized understanding of (a) maternal perceptions of children's food intake control; (b) how parent-child mealtime interactions influence maternal feeding practices; and (c) ways in which mothers may promote healthy child eating and weight outcomes. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 23 mothers (M = 38.4 ± 3.7 years of age) of preschool-aged children (M = 3.8 ± 0.6 years of age, 19 were normal weight, 14 were girls), who had previously completed child feeding questionnaire and participated in two home-based mealtime observations, 12 months apart. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and themes extracted to create the database. Four major themes emerged: (a) Maternal confidence in children's ability to regulate food intake is variable; (b) Implementing strategies for nurturing healthy relationships with food beyond the dining table; (c) Fostering positive mealtime interactions is valued above the content of what children eat; and (d) Situation-specific practices and inconsistencies. Findings indicate that maternal feeding practices are shaped by both parent and child influences, and child feeding is mostly guided by controlling the family food environment, rather than by directly pressuring or restricting their child's eating. Results also highlighted the need for research to consider both parent and child influences on child feeding.
Notes In press
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/mcn.12420
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091329

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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