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Healing the ‘scar’ of the landscape: post-mining landscape in Anglesea

Su, Yang and Jones, David 2017, Healing the ‘scar’ of the landscape: post-mining landscape in Anglesea, in DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology, Knowledge E Publishing, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, pp. 185-189, doi: 10.18502/keg.v2i2.613.

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Title Healing the ‘scar’ of the landscape: post-mining landscape in Anglesea
Author(s) Su, Yang
Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Conference name Design and Technology. International Conference (2016 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 2016/12/05 - 2016/12/08
Title of proceedings DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology
Editor(s) Collins, Paul K.ORCID iD for Collins, Paul K. orcid.org/0000-0003-3308-8689
Gibson, IanORCID iD for Gibson, Ian orcid.org/0000-0002-4149-9122
Publication date 2017
Conference series Design and Technology International Conference
Start page 185
End page 189
Total pages 8
Publisher Knowledge E Publishing
Place of publication Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Keyword(s) environmental bio-remediation
environmental design
Anglesea open cut
ecological determinism
Summary The nexus between environmental bio-remediation and environmental design, as it pertains to disused coal mining sites in Australia, is little investigated. Increasingly, many of these open cut extraction holes around south-eastern Australia, are becoming redundant as their resources are exhausted or non-economic viability creeps into the industry or are becoming management ’nightmares’. The recently announced March 2017 cessation of the Yallourn Power Station and associated brown coal Open Cut, and the recent fires and insurance liability legal determinations of the Yallourn Open Cut are exemplar of the former and latter respectively.This paper surveys the deeper bio-remediation and ecological transformative issues directly associated with the Anglesea brown coal Open Cut, and offers an ecological design lens insight as to possible treatments and scenarios that can be offered to guide the future use and management of the site. The lens demonstrates the richness that interdisciplinary design and applied research offers in assisting the healing and mediation of sites. The extraordinary nature and scope of the Anglesea coal mine site provides an opportunity to create a range of cultural attractions, natural succession treatments, natural bio-remediation strategies and educational opportunities. One scenario, for an Anglesea Lake Eco-Resort, proposes to incorporate an integrated Aboriginal cultural destination, performance centre, art installations and recreational venues, engaging the Anglesea community, visitors, researchers and students towards creating a vibrant and unique environment.
ISSN 2518-6841
Language eng
DOI 10.18502/keg.v2i2.613
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091414

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.