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Aboriginal voices and inclusivity in Australian land use Country planning

Powell, Gareth, McMahon, Shay and Jones, David 2017, Aboriginal voices and inclusivity in Australian land use Country planning, in DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology, Knowledge E, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, pp. 30-36, doi: 10.18502/keg.v2i2.592.

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Title Aboriginal voices and inclusivity in Australian land use Country planning
Author(s) Powell, Gareth
McMahon, Shay
Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Conference name Design and Technology. International Conference (2016 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 2016/12/05 - 2016/12/08
Title of proceedings DesTech 2016: Proceedings of the International Conference on Design and Technology
Editor(s) Collins, Paul K.ORCID iD for Collins, Paul K. orcid.org/0000-0003-3308-8689
Gibson, IanORCID iD for Gibson, Ian orcid.org/0000-0002-4149-9122
Publication date 2017
Conference series Design and Technology International Conference
Start page 30
End page 36
Total pages 7
Publisher Knowledge E
Place of publication Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Keyword(s) country
land
land use planning
professional accreditation
planning
Summary Following the Australian High Court’s decision in the Mabo case in 1992, it is now instrumental for land use planners to be educated and skilled in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people’s rights, interests, needs and aspirations in conventional and contemporary land use planning processes to ensure inclusivity within Australian culture and its structures. As an applied science discipline, for land use planning these imperatives include formally recognising ATSI peoples’ long connections with Country, acceptance of the High Court’s rejection of the doctrine of terra nullius, recognition that ATSI people will always retain their special relationship with and responsibility for land and sea Country, but more importantly incorporating Indigenous land planning values into extant Western land use planning instruments (ALGA 1999:225). This paper reviews and critiques the position and alignment of this applied science discipline, from an Indigenous perspective, and its policy and education accreditation governance role in responding to contemporary land use determinations as it impacts upon inclusivity of Indigenous knowledge, law, and policy in practice and educating the future generation of land use planners.
ISSN 2518-6841
Language eng
DOI 10.18502/keg.v2i2.592
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091416

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.