You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

The impact of heat exposure and sleep restriction on firefighters' work performance and physiology during simulated wildfire suppression

Vincent, Grace E., Aisbett, Brad, Larsen, Brianna, Ridgers, Nicola D., Snow, Rod and Ferguson, Sally A. 2017, The impact of heat exposure and sleep restriction on firefighters' work performance and physiology during simulated wildfire suppression, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/ijerph14020180.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
vincent-impactofheat-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 932.54KB 3

Title The impact of heat exposure and sleep restriction on firefighters' work performance and physiology during simulated wildfire suppression
Author(s) Vincent, Grace E.
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Larsen, Brianna
Ridgers, Nicola D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Snow, RodORCID iD for Snow, Rod orcid.org/0000-0002-4796-6916
Ferguson, Sally A.
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Article ID 180
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-02-12
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) firefighting
physical performance
sleep restriction
work physiology
Adult
Australia
Female
Firefighters
Heart Rate
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Deprivation
Time Factors
Work Performance
Summary This study was designed to examine the effects of ambient heat on firefighters' physical task performance, and physiological and perceptual responses when sleep restricted during simulated wildfire conditions. Thirty firefighters were randomly allocated to the sleep restricted (n = 17, SR; 19 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity) or hot and sleep restricted (n = 13, HOT + SR; 33 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity) condition. Firefighters performed two days of simulated, intermittent, self-paced work circuits comprising six firefighting tasks. Heart rate, and core temperature were measured continuously. After each task, firefighters reported their rating of perceived exertion and thermal sensation. Effort sensation was also reported after each work circuit. Fluids were consumed ad libitum. Urine volume and urine specific gravity were analysed. Sleep was monitored using polysomnography. There were no differences between the SR and HOT + SR groups in firefighters' physiological responses, hydration status, ratings of perceived exertion, motivation, and four of the six firefighting tasks (charged hose advance, rake, hose rolling, static hose hold). Black out hose and lateral repositioning were adversely affected in the HOT + SR group. Working in hot conditions did not appear to consistently impair firefighters work performance, physiology, and perceptual responses. Future research should determine whether such findings remain true when individual tasks are performed over longer durations.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14020180
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID DE120101173
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091570

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 14 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 01 Mar 2017, 08:39:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.