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Embodied cognition and social consumption: elf-regulating temperature through social products and behaviors

Lee, Seung Hwan (Mark), Rotman, Jeff D. and Perkins, Andrew W. 2014, Embodied cognition and social consumption: elf-regulating temperature through social products and behaviors, Journal of consumer psychology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 234-240, doi: 10.1016/j.jcps.2013.09.006.

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Title Embodied cognition and social consumption: elf-regulating temperature through social products and behaviors
Author(s) Lee, Seung Hwan (Mark)
Rotman, Jeff D.
Perkins, Andrew W.
Journal name Journal of consumer psychology
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 234
End page 240
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1057-7408
Keyword(s) embodied cognition
temperature
social consumption
social products
self-regulation
Summary Extant embodied cognition research suggests that individuals can reduce a perceived lack of interpersonal warmth by substituting physicalwarmth, and vice versa. We suggest that this behavior is self-regulatory in nature and that this self-regulation can be accomplished via consumptivebehavior. Experiment 1 found that consumers perceived ambient temperature to be significantly lower when eating alone compared to eating with apartner. Experiment 2 found that consuming a cool (vs. warm) drink led individuals to generate more socially-oriented attributes for a hypotheticalproduct. Experiment 3 found that physically cooler individuals desired a social consumption setting, whereas physically warmer individualsdesired a lone consumption setting. We interpret these results within the context of self-regulation, such that perceived physical temperaturedeviations from a steady state unconsciously motivate the individual to find bodily balance in order to alleviate that deviation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jcps.2013.09.006
Field of Research 1505 Marketing
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Society for Consumer Psychology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091714

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Marketing
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