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The use of mobile health to deliver self-management support to young people with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey

Dobson, Rosie, Whittaker, Robyn, Murphy, Rinki, Khanolkar, Manish, Miller, Steven, Naylor, Joanna and Maddison, Ralph 2017, The use of mobile health to deliver self-management support to young people with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey, JMIR diabetes, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.2196/diabetes.7221.

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Title The use of mobile health to deliver self-management support to young people with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey
Author(s) Dobson, Rosie
Whittaker, Robyn
Murphy, Rinki
Khanolkar, Manish
Miller, Steven
Naylor, Joanna
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name JMIR diabetes
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Article ID e4
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher JMIR Publications
Publication date 2017-02-15
Keyword(s) mHealth
diabetes mellitus
mobile phone
mobile applications
text messages
Summary Background: Young people living with type 1 diabetes face not only the challenges typical of adolescence, but also the challengesof daily management of their health and evolving understanding of the impact of their diagnosis on their future. Adolescence isa critical time for diabetes self-management, with a typical decline in glycemic control increasing risk for microvascular diabetescomplications. To improve glycemic control, there is a need for evidence-based self-management support interventions thataddress the issues pertinent to this population, utilizing platforms that engage them. Increasingly, mobile health (mHealth)interventions are being developed and evaluated for this purpose with some evidence supporting improved glycemic control. Anecessary step to enhance effectiveness of such approaches is to understand young people’s preferences for this mode of delivery.Objective: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the current and perceived roles of mHealth in supportingyoung people to manage their diabetes.Methods: Young adults (16-24 years) with type 1 diabetes in Auckland, New Zealand, were invited to take part in a survey vialetter from their diabetes specialist.Results: A total of 115 young adults completed the survey (mean age 19.5 years; male 52/115, 45%; European 89/115, 77%),with all reporting they owned a mobile phone and 96% (110/115) of those were smartphones. However, smartphone apps fordiabetes management had been used by only 33% (38/115) of respondents. The most commonly reported reason for not usingapps was a lack of awareness that they existed. Although the majority felt they managed their diabetes well, 63% (72/115) reportedwanting to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. A total of 64% (74/115) respondents reported that they would beinterested in receiving diabetes self-management support via text message (short message service, SMS).Conclusions: Current engagement with mHealth in this population appears low, although the findings from this study providesupport for the use of mHealth in this group because of the ubiquity and convenience of mobile devices. mHealth has potentialto provide information and support to this population, utilizing mediums commonplace for this group and with greater reach thantraditional methods.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/diabetes.7221
Field of Research 111716 Preventive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091730

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.