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Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

van der Ent, Antony, Callahan, Damien L., Noller, Barry N., Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta, Przybylowicz, Wojciech J., Barnabas, Alban and Harris, Hugh H. 2017, Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia), Scientific reports, vol. 7, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.1038/srep41861.

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Title Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)
Author(s) van der Ent, Antony
Callahan, Damien L.ORCID iD for Callahan, Damien L. orcid.org/0000-0002-6384-8717
Noller, Barry N.
Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta
Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.
Barnabas, Alban
Harris, Hugh H.
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 7
Article ID 41861
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-02-16
ISSN 2045-2322
Summary The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves - in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni 2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni 2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep41861
Field of Research 060799 Plant Biology not elsewhere classified
060705 Plant Physiology
060702 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091783

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.