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Effect of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis: a 12-month RCT

Multanen, J., Rantalainen, T., Kautiainen, H., Ahola, R., Jämsä, T., Nieminen, M.T., Lammentausta, E., Häkkinen, A., Kiviranta, I. and Heinonen, A. 2017, Effect of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis: a 12-month RCT, Osteoporosis international, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1323-1333, doi: 10.1007/s00198-016-3875-1.

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Title Effect of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis: a 12-month RCT
Author(s) Multanen, J.
Rantalainen, T.
Kautiainen, H.
Ahola, R.
Jämsä, T.
Nieminen, M.T.
Lammentausta, E.
Häkkinen, A.
Kiviranta, I.
Heinonen, A.
Journal name Osteoporosis international
Volume number 28
Issue number 4
Start page 1323
End page 1333
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-04
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Keyword(s) cartilage
exercise
menopause
RCT
Summary It is uncertain whether subjects with mild knee osteoarthritis, and who may be at risk of osteoporosis, can exercise safely with the aim of improving hip bone strength. This RCT showed that participating in a high-impact exercise program improved femoral neck strength without any detrimental effects on knee cartilage composition. INTRODUCTION: No previous studies have examined whether high-impact exercise can improve bone strength and articular cartilage quality in subjects with mild knee osteoarthritis. In this 12-month RCT, we assessed the effects of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength and biochemical composition of knee cartilage in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Eighty postmenopausal women with mild knee radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into the exercise (n = 40) or control (n = 40) group. Femoral neck structural strength was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The knee cartilage region exposed to exercise loading was measured by the quantitative MRI techniques of T2 mapping and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Also, an accelerometer-based body movement monitor was used to evaluate the total physical activity loading on the changes of femoral neck strength in all participants. Training effects on the outcome variables were estimated by the bootstrap analysis of covariance. RESULTS: A significant between-group difference in femoral neck bending strength in favor of the trainees was observed after the 12-month intervention (4.4%, p < 0.01). The change in femoral neck bending strength remained significant after adjusting for baseline value, age, height, and body mass (4.0%, p = 0.020). In all participants, the change in bending strength was associated with the total physical activity loading (r = 0.29, p = 0.012). The exercise participation had no effect on knee cartilage composition. CONCLUSION: The high-impact training increased femoral neck strength without having any harmful effect on knee cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis. These findings imply that progressive high-impact exercise is a feasible method in seeking to prevent hip fractures in postmenopausal women whose articular cartilage may also be frail.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00198-016-3875-1
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, International Osteoporosis Foundation + National Osteoporosis Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091865

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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