You are not logged in.

Global trends and patterns of commercial milk-based formula sales: is an unprecedented infant and young child feeding transition underway?

Baker, Phillip, Smith, Julie, Salmon, Libby, Friel, Sharon, Kent, George, Iellamo, Alessandro, Dadhich, J. P. and Renfrew, Mary J. 2016, Global trends and patterns of commercial milk-based formula sales: is an unprecedented infant and young child feeding transition underway?, Public health nutrition, vol. 19, no. 14, pp. 2540-2550, doi: 10.1017/S1368980016001117.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Global trends and patterns of commercial milk-based formula sales: is an unprecedented infant and young child feeding transition underway?
Author(s) Baker, PhillipORCID iD for Baker, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-0802-2349
Smith, Julie
Salmon, Libby
Friel, Sharon
Kent, George
Iellamo, Alessandro
Dadhich, J. P.
Renfrew, Mary J.
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 19
Issue number 14
Start page 2540
End page 2550
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Breast-milk substitutes
Formula
Infant and young child feeding
Nutrition transition
Summary OBJECTIVE: The marketing of infant/child milk-based formulas (MF) contributes to suboptimal breast-feeding and adversely affects child and maternal health outcomes globally. However, little is known about recent changes in MF markets. The present study describes contemporary trends and patterns of MF sales at the global, regional and country levels.
DESIGN: Descriptive statistics of trends and patterns in MF sales volume per infant/child for the years 2008-2013 and projections to 2018, using industry-sourced data.
SETTING: Eighty countries categorized by country income bracket, for developing countries by region, and in countries with the largest infant/child populations.
SUBJECTS: MF categories included total (for ages 0-36 months), infant (0-6 months), follow-up (7-12 months), toddler (13-36 months) and special (0-6 months).
RESULTS: In 2008-2013 world total MF sales grew by 40·8 % from 5·5 to 7·8 kg per infant/child/year, a figure predicted to increase to 10·8 kg by 2018. Growth was most rapid in East Asia particularly in China, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam and was led by the infant and follow-up formula categories. Sales volume per infant/child was positively associated with country income level although with wide variability between countries.
CONCLUSIONS: A global infant and young child feeding (IYCF) transition towards diets higher in MF is underway and is expected to continue apace. The observed increase in MF sales raises serious concern for global child and maternal health, particularly in East Asia, and calls into question the efficacy of current regulatory regimes designed to protect and promote optimal IYCF. The observed changes have not been captured by existing IYCF monitoring systems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980016001117
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091867

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 21 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 10 Mar 2017, 15:19:06 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.