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Carbon diffusion and nanocrystalline diamond formation in carbon ion-implanted oxides studied by nuclear elastic scattering

Orwa, J.O., Jamieson, D.N., Prawer, S. and McCallum, J.C. 2001, Carbon diffusion and nanocrystalline diamond formation in carbon ion-implanted oxides studied by nuclear elastic scattering, Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research B, vol. 175-177, pp. 554-558, doi: 10.1016/S0168-583X(00)00675-3.

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Title Carbon diffusion and nanocrystalline diamond formation in carbon ion-implanted oxides studied by nuclear elastic scattering
Author(s) Orwa, J.O.ORCID iD for Orwa, J.O. orcid.org/0000-0001-6041-6751
Jamieson, D.N.
Prawer, S.
McCallum, J.C.
Journal name Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research B
Volume number 175-177
Start page 554
End page 558
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2001-04
ISSN 0168-583X
Keyword(s) nanodiamond
ion implantation
annealing ambient studies
non-rutherford scattering
Summary We have shown that MeV implantation of carbon into fused quartz and sapphire followed by thermal annealing in a suitable environment can result in the formation of diamond. Using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), we determined (in a previous paper) that, following annealing, there was a redistribution of carbon from the original implantation depth, depending on the annealing environment, annealing time and annealing temperature. In our search, for the optimum implantation and annealing parameters to maximize the yield of diamond, we have used backscattering spectrometry (BS), with MeV hydrogen, to profile the implanted carbon, taking advantage of the large C(p,p)C scattering cross-section at around 1.73 MeV. We studied samples of fused quartz and sapphire implanted with carbon to a range of doses and annealed in forming gas, oxygen and argon. We show that in an oxygen environment, there is significant carbon loss in fused quartz but not in sapphire while in the other environments no significant loss is reported. We conclude that redistribution of carbon, the formation of nanocrystalline diamond (as seen in cross-sectional TEM) and possible carbon loss is determined both by the mobility of carbon in the host matrix at the prevailing annealing temperatures and, most importantly, the annealing ambient.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/S0168-583X(00)00675-3
Field of Research 091202 Composite and Hybrid Materials
Socio Economic Objective 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2001, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091889

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Engineering
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