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A mobile technology intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour in 2- to 4-year-old children (Mini Movers): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Downing, Katherine L., Salmon, Jo, Hinkley, Trina, Hnatiuk, Jill A. and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2017, A mobile technology intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour in 2- to 4-year-old children (Mini Movers): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, Trials, vol. 18, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s13063-017-1841-7.

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Title A mobile technology intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour in 2- to 4-year-old children (Mini Movers): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Downing, Katherine L.
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Hnatiuk, Jill A.
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name Trials
Volume number 18
Article ID 97
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-03-03
ISSN 1745-6215
Keyword(s) sedentary behaviour
screen time
television viewing
sitting time
early childhood
randomised controlled trial
mHealth
text messaging
SMS
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
AGED 0-4 YEARS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
HEALTH INDICATORS
OVERWEIGHT
OBESITY
FEASIBILITY
RELIABILITY
CHILDHOOD
Summary Background
Sedentary behaviour (e.g. television viewing, sitting time) tracks over time and is associated with adverse health and developmental outcomes across the lifespan. Young children (5 years or younger) spend up to 12 h/day sedentary, of which around 2 h is spent in screen time (e.g. watching television). Interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in early childhood report mixed results and many have limited potential for scalability. Mobile phones offer a wide-reaching, low-cost avenue for the delivery of health behaviour programmes to parents but their potential to reduce young children’s sedentary behaviour has not been widely tested. This study aims to test the feasibility and efficacy of a parent-focused, predominantly mobile telephone-delivered intervention to support parents to minimise the amount of time their child spends using screens and in overall sitting time.

Methods/design
Mini Movers is a pilot randomised controlled trial recruiting 100 parents and children. Inclusion criteria include having a child aged between 2 and 4 years, being able to speak, read and write English, and smartphone ownership. Participants will be randomised to the intervention or a wait-list control group at a 1:1 ratio. Intervention group parents will receive printed materials including a content booklet and goal-checking magnet and will participate in a one-on-one discussion with the interventionist to plan two goals to reduce their child’s sedentary behaviour. Subsequently, the intervention will be delivered over 6 weeks via personalised and interactive text messages promoting positive health behaviours (strategies for decreasing screen time and overall sitting time), goal setting and self-monitoring. Outcomes to be assessed include intervention feasibility and children’s screen time and objectively-assessed sitting time.

Discussion
Few studies have used mobile phone technology to deliver health behaviour programmes to parents of young children. Findings will inform the development of larger-scale interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour during early childhood.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-1841-7
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092004

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.