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Cancer brings forward oviposition in the fly Drosophila melanogaster

Arnal, Audrey, Jacqueline, Camille, Ujvari, Beata, Leger, Lucas, Moreno, Céline, Faugere, Dominique, Tasiemski, Aurélie, Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline, Misse, Dorothée, Renaud, François, Montagne, Jacques, Casali, Andreu, Roche, Benjamin, Mery, Frédéric and Thomas, Frédéric 2017, Cancer brings forward oviposition in the fly Drosophila melanogaster, Ecology and evolution, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 272-276, doi: 10.1002/ece3.2571.

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Title Cancer brings forward oviposition in the fly Drosophila melanogaster
Formatted title Cancer brings forward oviposition in the fly Drosophila melanogaster
Author(s) Arnal, Audrey
Jacqueline, Camille
Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Leger, Lucas
Moreno, Céline
Faugere, Dominique
Tasiemski, Aurélie
Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline
Misse, Dorothée
Renaud, François
Montagne, Jacques
Casali, Andreu
Roche, Benjamin
Mery, Frédéric
Thomas, Frédéric
Journal name Ecology and evolution
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Start page 272
End page 276
Total pages 5
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 2045-7758
Keyword(s) cancer
fecundity
life‐history strategy
reproduction
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
life-history strategy
REPRODUCTIVE EFFORT
LIFE-HISTORY
EVOLUTION
RAS
PERSPECTIVE
PROGRESSION
PARASITISM
MUTATIONS
SELECTION
WILDLIFE
Summary Hosts often accelerate their reproductive effort in response to a parasitic infection, especially when their chances of future reproduction decrease with time from the onset of the infection. Because malignancies usually reduce survival, and hence potentially the fitness, it is expected that hosts with early cancer could have evolved to adjust their life-history traits to maximize their immediate reproductive effort. Despite the potential importance of these plastic responses, little attention has been devoted to explore how cancers influence animal reproduction. Here, we use an experimental setup, a colony of genetically modified flies Drosophila melanogaster which develop colorectal cancer in the anterior gut, to show the role of cancer in altering life-history traits. Specifically, we tested whether females adapt their reproductive strategy in response to harboring cancer. We found that flies with cancer reached the peak period of oviposition significantly earlier (i.e., 2 days) than healthy ones, while no difference in the length and extent of the fecundity peak was observed between the two groups of flies. Such compensatory responses to overcome the fitness-limiting effect of cancer could explain the persistence of inherited cancer-causing mutant alleles in the wild.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2571
Field of Research 060305 Evolution of Developmental Systems
060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092006

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.