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The relative ability of different front-of-pack labels to assist consumers discriminate between healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy foods

Talati, Zenobia, Pettigrew, Simone, Ball, Kylie, Hughes, Clare, Kelly, Bridget, Neal, Bruce and Dixon, Helen 2017, The relative ability of different front-of-pack labels to assist consumers discriminate between healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy foods, Food quality and preference, vol. 59, pp. 109-113, doi: 10.1016/j.foodqual.2017.02.010.

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Title The relative ability of different front-of-pack labels to assist consumers discriminate between healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy foods
Author(s) Talati, Zenobia
Pettigrew, Simone
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Hughes, Clare
Kelly, Bridget
Neal, Bruce
Dixon, Helen
Journal name Food quality and preference
Volume number 59
Start page 109
End page 113
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-07
ISSN 0950-3293
Keyword(s) front-of-pack labels
health star rating
traffic lights
daily intake
perceived healthiness
Summary The degree to which different front-of-pack labels (FoPLs) can assist consumers to make healthy choices seems to depend on the extent to which the FoPLs provide an interpretation of the nutrition information presented. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of three FoPLs that vary by interpretive content in allowing consumers to discriminate between products of varying healthiness. Australian consumers (n = 2058) rated the perceived healthiness of mock food pack images that varied according to: nutritional profile (healthy, moderately healthy, unhealthy); FoPL (Daily Intake Guide (DIG), Multiple Traffic Lights (MTL), Health Star Rating (HSR), or control); and food type (cookies, cornflakes, pizza, yoghurt). Respondents were most accurate at differentiating unhealthy products from healthy (p < 0.001) and moderately healthy products (p = 0.015) when the HSR appeared on packs. The MTL was marginally (p = 0.052) effective at helping respondents distinguish between healthy and unhealthy products. When the DIG or no FoPL was used, however, respondents were unable to discriminate between a healthy and an unhealthy nutritional profile. Findings indicate that the HSR is more effective than other commonly used FoPLs in assisting consumers to accurately evaluate the healthiness of food products.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.foodqual.2017.02.010
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
0908 Food Sciences
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID ARC LP130100428
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-08-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092152

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