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Caregivers' information needs and their 'experiences of care' during treatment are associated with elevated anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional study of the caregivers of renal cancer survivors

Oberoi, Devesh V., White, Vicki, Jefford, Michael, Giles, Graham G., Bolton, Damien, Davis, Ian, Winship, Ingrid, Prince, H. Miles, Millar, Jeremy, Harrison, Simon, Kay, Anne and Hill, David 2016, Caregivers' information needs and their 'experiences of care' during treatment are associated with elevated anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional study of the caregivers of renal cancer survivors, Support care cancer, vol. 24, no. 10, pp. 4177-4186, doi: 10.1007/s00520-016-3245-8.

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Title Caregivers' information needs and their 'experiences of care' during treatment are associated with elevated anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional study of the caregivers of renal cancer survivors
Author(s) Oberoi, Devesh V.
White, VickiORCID iD for White, Vicki orcid.org/0000-0001-6619-8484
Jefford, Michael
Giles, Graham G.
Bolton, Damien
Davis, Ian
Winship, Ingrid
Prince, H. Miles
Millar, Jeremy
Harrison, Simon
Kay, Anne
Hill, David
Journal name Support care cancer
Volume number 24
Issue number 10
Start page 4177
End page 4186
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer Verlag
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-05-05
ISSN 1433-7339
Keyword(s) anxiety
caregivers
depression
renal cell carcinoma
unmet needs
Summary PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the unmet needs and psychological distress (anxiety and depression) in family caregivers of renal cell carcinoma survivors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used. Unmet needs were assessed with the Supportive Care Needs Survey-Partners and Caregivers (SCNS-P&C) questionnaire, and psychological distress was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in a telephone survey of 196 caregivers of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) survivors. Chi-square tests examined bivariate relationships, and multivariate logistic regression examined the associations between anxiety and depression and of unmet needs with caregivers' experience of patients' care, time spent caregiving, caregivers' demographic characteristics and patients' disease stage. RESULTS: Sixty-four percent of caregivers had at least one low, moderate or high unmet need, with 53 % reporting at least three needs and 29 % reporting 10 or more unmet needs (median 2, range 0-38). Elevated anxiety (HADS-A > 8) and depression (HADS-D > 8) were found in 29 and 11 % of the sample, respectively. Psychological and emotional needs were associated with advanced cancer stage (stages 3 and 4) (OR 3.07, 95 % CI 1.35-6.76) and with experience of care during surgery (OR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.78-0.99). Healthcare service needs were associated with time spent caregiving, with caregivers spending >1 h/day in the past week having three times higher odds (OR 3.44, 95 % CI 1.52-7.72) than those not spending any time. Odds of experiencing information needs were lower in caregivers who were in a relationship (OR 0.20, 95 % CI 0.04-0.83). Elevated anxiety (OR 1.59, 95 % CI 1.09-2.33) and depression (OR 2.02, 95 % CI 1.08-3.79) were associated with unmet information needs. Depression was also associated with experiences of care during treatment (OR 0.69, 95 % CI 0.49-0.96). CONCLUSION: RCC caregivers' unmet information needs are associated with elevated anxiety and depression. Improved experiences of cancer care are associated with lower odds of unmet needs and elevated depression in RCC caregivers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3245-8
Field of Research 111204 Cancer Therapy (excl Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092208

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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