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Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis

Newman, Peter, Galeano Niño, Jorge Luis, Graney, Pamela, Razal, Joselito M., Minett, Andrew I., Ribas, João, Ovalle-Robles, Raquel, Biro, Maté and Zreiqat, Hala 2016, Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis, Scientific reports, vol. 6, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1038/srep37909.

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Title Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis
Author(s) Newman, Peter
Galeano Niño, Jorge Luis
Graney, Pamela
Razal, Joselito M.
Minett, Andrew I.
Ribas, João
Ovalle-Robles, Raquel
Biro, Maté
Zreiqat, Hala
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Article ID 37909
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
MESENCHYMAL STEM
SATELLITE CELLS
IN-VITRO
OSTEOGENIC DIFFERENTIATION
MYOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION
ELECTROSPUN NANOFIBERS
EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX
UP-REGULATION
MECHANOTRANSDUCTION
TOPOGRAPHY
Summary The topography of a biomaterial regulates cellular interactions and determine stem cell fate. A complete understanding of how topographical properties affect cell behavior will allow the rational design of material surfaces that elicit specified biological functions once placed in the body. To this end, we fabricate substrates with aligned or randomly organized fibrous nanostructured topographies. Culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), we explore the dynamic relationship between the alignment of topography, cell shape and cell differentiation to osteogenic and myogenic lineages. We show aligned topographies differentiate cells towards a satellite cell muscle progenitor state - a distinct cell myogenic lineage responsible for postnatal growth and repair of muscle. We analyze cell shape between the different topographies, using fluorescent time-lapse imaging over 21 days. In contrast to previous work, this allows the direct measurement of cell shape at a given time rather than defining the morphology of the underlying topography and neglecting cell shape. We report quantitative metrics of the time-based morphological behaviors of cell shape in response to differing topographies. This analysis offers insights into the relationship between topography, cell shape and cell differentiation. Cells differentiating towards a myogenic fate on aligned topographies adopt a characteristic elongated shape as well as the alignment of cells.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep37909
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092276

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.