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Contribution of trans-fatty acid intake to coronary heart disease burden in Australia: a modelling study

Wu, Jason H. Y., Zheng, Miaobing, Catterall, Elise, Downs, Shauna, Thomas, Beth, Veerman, Lennert and Barendregt, Jan J. 2017, Contribution of trans-fatty acid intake to coronary heart disease burden in Australia: a modelling study, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3390/nu9010077.

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Title Contribution of trans-fatty acid intake to coronary heart disease burden in Australia: a modelling study
Author(s) Wu, Jason H. Y.
Zheng, Miaobing
Catterall, Elise
Downs, Shauna
Thomas, Beth
Veerman, Lennert
Barendregt, Jan J.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Article ID 77
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) trans-fatty acid
coronary heart disease
Australia
burden
mortality
Summary Trans-fatty acids (TFAs) intake has been consistently associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. We provided an updated assessment of TFA intake in Australian adults in 2010 and conducted modeling to estimate CHD mortality attributable to TFA intake. Data of the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey was used to assess TFA intake. The CHD burden attributable to TFA was calculated by comparing the current level of TFA intake to a counterfactual setting where consumption was lowered to a theoretical minimum distribution of 0.5% energy. The average TFA intake among adults was 0.59% energy, and overall 10% of adults exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended limit of 1% energy. Education and income were moderately and inversely associated with TFA intake (p-value ≤ 0.001), with one in seven adults in the lowest income and education quintile having >1% energy from TFA. Australia had 487 CHD deaths (95% uncertainty interval, 367–615) due to TFA exposure, equivalent to 1.52% (95% uncertainty limits: 1.15%–1.92%) of all CHD mortality. The relative impact of TFA exposure on CHD mortality in Australia is limited, but, in absolute terms, still substantial. Policies aimed at reducing industrial TFA exposure can reduce socioeconomic inequalities in health and may therefore be desirable.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9010077
Field of Research 110299 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology not elsewhere classified
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092297

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.