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Working with social media in tertiary education: a contested space between academics and policies

Willems, Julie, Adachi, Chie and Grevtseva, Yana 2016, Working with social media in tertiary education: a contested space between academics and policies, in ASCILITE 2016 : Show Me The Learning : Proceedings of the 33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education, University of South Australia, Adelaide, S.Aust., pp. 648-653.

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Title Working with social media in tertiary education: a contested space between academics and policies
Author(s) Willems, JulieORCID iD for Willems, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-0487-6192
Adachi, Chie
Grevtseva, Yana
Conference name Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education. Conference (33rd : 2016 : Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 28-30 Nov. 2016
Title of proceedings ASCILITE 2016 : Show Me The Learning : Proceedings of the 33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education
Editor(s) Barker, S.
Dawson, S.
Pardo, A.
Colvin, C.
Publication date 2016
Start page 648
End page 653
Total pages 5
Publisher University of South Australia
Place of publication Adelaide, S.Aust.
Keyword(s) social media
policy
tertiary education
learning
teaching
professional development
Summary Managing the use of social media in tertiary institutions is not as straight-forward as it may first seem. There is a multiplicity of facets which interplay within this space, from the espoused University policies on the one side of the coin, to the actual practices by students and staff on the other. At times, this misalignment is not the result of deliberate waywardness. For academics, deciphering and adhering to institutional policy whilst simultaneously attempting to enrich students’ learning experiences is a difficult feat. This paper explores this contested space, examining the tensions between social media as a disruptive technology, coupled with the interpretation of institutional policies. Our analysis points to a call for clarity in and around institutional policy in the implementation of social media for teaching and learning in higher education.
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 930299 Teaching and Instruction not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2016, ASCILITE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092300

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