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Can an incentive-based intervention increase physical activity and reduce sitting among adults? The ACHIEVE (Active Choices IncEntiVE) feasibility study

Ball, Kylie, Hunter, Ruth F., Maple, Jaimee-Lee, Moodie, Marj, Salmon, Jo, Ong, Kok-Leong, Stephens, Lena D., Jackson, Michelle and Crawford, David 2017, Can an incentive-based intervention increase physical activity and reduce sitting among adults? The ACHIEVE (Active Choices IncEntiVE) feasibility study, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 14, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12966-017-0490-2.

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Title Can an incentive-based intervention increase physical activity and reduce sitting among adults? The ACHIEVE (Active Choices IncEntiVE) feasibility study
Author(s) Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Hunter, Ruth F.
Maple, Jaimee-Lee
Moodie, Marj
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Ong, Kok-Leong
Stephens, Lena D.
Jackson, Michelle
Crawford, DavidORCID iD for Crawford, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 14
Article ID 35
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) physical activity
sedentary behavior
intervention
incentivisation
contingency management theory
control theory
body mass index
blood pressure
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
FINANCIAL INCENTIVES
ENCOURAGING UPTAKE
HEALTHY BEHAVIORS
METAANALYSIS
ACCEPTABILITY
EXERCISE
Summary Background
Despite recent interest in the potential of incentivisation as a strategy for motivating healthier behaviors, little remains known about the effectiveness of incentives in promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior, and improving associated health outcomes.

This pre-post-test design study investigated the feasibility, appeal and effects of providing non-financial incentives for promoting increased physical activity, reduced sedentary time, and reduced body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure among inactive middle-aged adults.

Methods
Inactive men (n = 36) and women (n = 46) aged 40–65 years were recruited via a not-for-profit insurance fund and participated in a 4 month pre-post design intervention. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected on self-reported physical activity and sitting time (IPAQ-Long), BMI and blood pressure. Participants were encouraged to increase physical activity to 150 mins/week and reduce sedentary behavior by 150 mins/week in progressive increments. Incentives included clothing, recipe books, store gift vouchers, and a chance to win one of four Apple iPad Mini devices. The incentive component of the intervention was supported by an initial motivational interview and text messaging to encourage participants and provide strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors.

Results

Only two participants withdrew during the program, demonstrating the feasibility of recruiting and retaining inactive middle-aged participants. While two-thirds of the sample qualified for the easiest physical activity incentive (by demonstrating 100 mins physical activity/week or 100 mins reduced sitting time/week), only one third qualified for the most challenging incentive. Goals to reduce sitting appeared more challenging, with 43% of participants qualifying for the first incentive, but only 20% for the last incentive. More men than women qualified for most incentives. Mean leisure-time physical activity increased by 252 mins/week (leisure-time), with 65% of the sample achieving at least 150 mins/week; and sitting time decreased by 3.1 h/day (both p < 0.001) between baseline and follow-up. BMI, systolic and diastolic (men only) blood pressure all significantly decreased. Most participants (50–85%) reported finding the incentives and other program components helpful/motivating.

Conclusions
Acknowledging the uncontrolled design, the large pre-post changes in behavioral and health-related outcomes suggest that the ACHIEVE incentives-based behavior change program represents a promising approach for promoting physical activity and reducing sitting, and should be tested in a randomized controlled trial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0490-2
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092404

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.