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The impact of shiftwork on skeletal muscle health

Aisbett, Brad, Condo, Dominique, Zacharewicz, Evelyn and Lamon, Severine 2017, The impact of shiftwork on skeletal muscle health, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.3390/nu9030248.

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Title The impact of shiftwork on skeletal muscle health
Author(s) Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Condo, DominiqueORCID iD for Condo, Dominique orcid.org/0000-0002-8348-7488
Zacharewicz, Evelyn
Lamon, SeverineORCID iD for Lamon, Severine orcid.org/0000-0002-3271-6551
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Article ID 248
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) hormones
protein intake
resistance training
sleep
Summary (1) Background: About one in four workers undertake shift rosters that fall outside the traditional 7 a.m.-6 p.m. scheduling. Shiftwork alters workers' exposure to natural and artificial light, sleep patterns, and feeding patterns. When compared to the rest of the working population, shiftworkers are at a greater risk of developing metabolic impairments over time. One fundamental component of metabolic health is skeletal muscle, the largest organ in the body. However, cause-and-effect relationships between shiftwork and skeletal muscle health have not been established; (2) Methods: A critical review of the literature was completed using online databases and reference lists; (3) Results: We propose a conceptual model drawing relationships between typical shiftwork consequences; altered light exposure, sleep patterns, and food and beverage consumption, and drivers of skeletal muscle health-protein intake, resistance training, and hormone release. At present, there is no study investigating the direct effect of shiftwork on skeletal muscle health. Instead, research findings showing that acute consequences of shiftwork negatively influence skeletal muscle homeostasis support the validity of our model; (4) Conclusion: Further research is required to test the potential relationships identified in our review, particularly in shiftwork populations. Part of this testing could include skeletal muscle specific interventions such as targeted protein intake and/or resistance-training.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9030248
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092657

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.