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'Maximising shareholder value': a detailed insight into the corporate political activity of the Australian food industry

Mialon, Melissa, Swinburn, Boyd, Allender, Steven and Sacks, Gary 2017, 'Maximising shareholder value': a detailed insight into the corporate political activity of the Australian food industry, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 165-171, doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12639.

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Title 'Maximising shareholder value': a detailed insight into the corporate political activity of the Australian food industry
Author(s) Mialon, Melissa
Swinburn, Boyd
Allender, Steven
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 41
Issue number 2
Start page 165
End page 171
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-04
ISSN 1753-6405
Keyword(s) corporate political activity
food industry
non-communicable diseases
policy
Australia
Health Policy
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Lobbying
Policy Making
Politics
Public Health
Public Relations
Social Responsibility
Summary OBJECTIVE: To gain deeper insight into the corporate political activity (CPA) of the Australian food industry from a public health perspective.

METHODS: Fifteen interviews with a purposive sample of current and former policy makers, public health advocates and academics who have closely interacted with food industry representatives or observed food industry behaviours.

RESULTS: All participants reported having directly experienced the CPA of the food industry during their careers, with the 'information and messaging' and 'constituency building' strategies most prominent. Participants expressed concern that food industry CPA strategies resulted in weakened policy responses to addressing diet-related disease.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides direct evidence of food industry practices that have the potential to shape public health-related policies and programs in Australia in ways that favour business interests at the expense of population health. Implications for public health: This evidence can inform policy makers and public health advocates and be used to adopt measures to ensure that public interests are put at the forefront as part of the policy development and implementation process.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12639
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1402 Applied Economics
1605 Policy And Administration
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092671

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.