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Evaluation of an ultra-brief psycho-education and referral intervention provided to patients presenting to a hospital emergency department with symptoms of panic attack

Murphy, Cassandra, Jaman, Anda, Craike, Melinda, Haynes, Janet and Austin, David W. 2016, Evaluation of an ultra-brief psycho-education and referral intervention provided to patients presenting to a hospital emergency department with symptoms of panic attack, Advances in mental health, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 38-47, doi: 10.1080/18387357.2015.1051175.

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Title Evaluation of an ultra-brief psycho-education and referral intervention provided to patients presenting to a hospital emergency department with symptoms of panic attack
Author(s) Murphy, Cassandra
Jaman, Anda
Craike, Melinda
Haynes, Janet
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Journal name Advances in mental health
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 38
End page 47
Total pages 10
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1838-7357
1837-4905
Keyword(s) emergency department
mental health
clinical management
psychology
psychological interventions
panic
brief intervention
Summary People who experience panic attacks are frequent utilisers of hospital Emergency Departments (EDs). The ED setting provides an opportunity to provide ultra-brief interventions, specifically by referring these patients to specialist mental health care. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an ultra-brief psycho-education and referral intervention, a panic information card (PIC), currently distributed at three Victorian EDs. Participants were a convenience sample of 72 individuals (20 males and 51 females, 1 unspecified) who had presented to an ED for panic symptoms in the past 12 months. Individuals self-identified as either a card receiver (CR) or a non-card receiver (NCR). Two senior ED staff members were interviewed regarding their evaluation of the effectiveness of the PIC. It was hypothesised that CRs would; (1) review the PIC favourably; (2) be more likely to seek help for PA than NCRs; (3) seek help sooner than NCRs; and (4) seek help on fewer occasions post-intervention than NCRs. Staff were hypothesised to review the card favourably and as a simple addition to ED practice. Both CRs and staff reviewed the PIC favourably, though there were no significant differences in help-seeking behaviour or time taken to access help between groups. CRs sought help on significantly fewer occasions than NCRs. Despite limitations of non-randomisation and modest sample size, this study contributes to evidence on the utility of ultra-brief interventions and supports the potential of ultra-brief ED-based interventions to expedite mental health referral, decrease utilisation of ED by panickers, reduce financial costs for the medical system, and increase psycho-education of sufferers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/18387357.2015.1051175
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092728

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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