You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Food systems transformations, ultra-processed food markets and the nutrition transition in Asia

Baker, Phillip and Friel, Sharon 2016, Food systems transformations, ultra-processed food markets and the nutrition transition in Asia, Globalization and health, vol. 12, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12992-016-0223-3.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
baker-foodsystems-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 961.04KB 5

Title Food systems transformations, ultra-processed food markets and the nutrition transition in Asia
Author(s) Baker, PhillipORCID iD for Baker, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-0802-2349
Friel, Sharon
Journal name Globalization and health
Volume number 12
Article ID 80
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1744-8603
Keyword(s) transnational food and beverage corporations
foreign investment
market power
processed foods
food systems
supermarkets
nutrition transition
Asia
Summary BACKGROUND: Attracted by their high economic growth rates, young and growing populations, and increasingly open markets, transnational food and beverage corporations (TFBCs) are targeting Asian markets with vigour. Simultaneously the consumption of ultra-processed foods high in fat, salt and glycaemic load is increasing in the region. Evidence demonstrates that TFBCs can leverage their market power to shape food systems in ways that alter the availability, price, nutritional quality, desirability and ultimately consumption of such foods. This paper describes recent changes in Asian food systems driven by TFBCs in the retail, manufacturing and food service sectors and considers the implications for population nutrition.

METHOD: Market data for each sector was sourced from Euromonitor International for four lower-middle income, three upper-middle income and five high-income Asian countries. Descriptive statistics were used to describe trends in ultra-processed food consumption (2000-2013), packaged food retail distribution channels (1999-2013), 'market transnationalization' defined as the market share held by TFBCs relative to domestic firms (2004-2013), and 'market concentration' defined as the market share and thus market power held by the four leading firms (2004-2013) in each market.

RESULTS: Ultra-processed food sales has increased rapidly in most middle-income countries. Carbonated soft drinks was the leading product category, in which Coca-Cola and PepsiCo had a regional oligopoly. Supermarkets, hypermarkets and convenience stores were becoming increasingly dominant as distribution channels for packaged foods throughout the region. Market concentration was increasing in the grocery retail sector in all countries. Food service sales are increasing in all countries led by McDonalds and Yum! Brands. However, in all three sectors TFBCs face strong competition from Asian firms.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the findings suggest that market forces are likely to be significant but variable drivers of Asia's nutrition transition. The carbonated soft drink market is the most highly concentrated and likely to be most harmful to population nutrition. The grocery retail sector is, in terms of increasing market concentration and thus market power, likely to be the most important driver of ongoing food systems change and ultra-processed food sales in the region. Given it's rapid growth, the food service sector will also contribute significantly to ongoing dietary change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12992-016-0223-3
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092736

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 27 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 03 Apr 2017, 12:50:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.