You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

A systematic review: children & adolescents as simulated patients in health professional education

Gamble, Andree, Bearman, Margaret and Nestel, Debra 2016, A systematic review: children & adolescents as simulated patients in health professional education, Advances in simulation, vol. 1, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1186/s41077-015-0003-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
bearman-asystematicreview-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 824.38KB 2

Title A systematic review: children & adolescents as simulated patients in health professional education
Author(s) Gamble, Andree
Bearman, Margaret
Nestel, Debra
Journal name Advances in simulation
Volume number 1
Article ID 1
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2059-0628
Keyword(s) simulation
education
simulated/standardized patient
child
adolescent
nursing
health professionals
systematic review
Summary Simulated patients (SP) contribute to health professional education for communication, clinical skills teaching, and assessment. Although a significant body of literature exists on the involvement of adult SPs, limited research has been conducted on the contribution of children and adolescents. This systematic review, using narrative summary with thematic synthesis, aims to report findings related to children/adolescents as simulated patients in health professions education (undergraduate or post-graduate). A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature published between 1980 and September 2014 was undertaken using databases including CINAHL, Ovid Medline and Scopus. The lack of literature related to the employment of children and adolescents in nursing education dictated the expansion of the search to the wider health professions. Key search terms related to the employment of children and adolescents in health professional education programs. A total of 58 studies reduced to 36 following exclusion based on abstract review. Twenty-two studies reached full text review; following application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 15 English language studies involving children and/or adolescents in simulation formed part of this systematic review. Five key themes emerged: Process related to recruitment, duration and content of training programs, support and debriefing practice, ethical considerations, and effects of participation for key stakeholders such as children and adolescents, parent and faculty, and learner outcomes. The results suggest that the involvement of children and adolescents in simulation for education and assessment purposes is valuable and feasible. The review identified the potential for harm to children/adolescents; however, rigorous selection, training and support strategies can mitigate negative outcomes. The ability of children to portray a role consistently across assessments, and deliver constructive feedback remains ambiguous.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s41077-015-0003-9
Field of Research 130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092761

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 20 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 03 Apr 2017, 13:01:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.