You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Proactive student engagement with fitness to practise

Lo, Kristin, Maloney, Stephen, Bearman, Margaret and Morgan, Prue 2014, Proactive student engagement with fitness to practise, Journal of biomedical education, vol. 2014, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1155/2014/578649.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
bearman-proactivestudent-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 351.20KB 3

Title Proactive student engagement with fitness to practise
Author(s) Lo, Kristin
Maloney, Stephen
Bearman, Margaret
Morgan, Prue
Journal name Journal of biomedical education
Volume number 2014
Article ID 578649
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication Cairo, Egypt
Publication date 2014
ISSN 2314-5021
2314-503X
Keyword(s) Health professional education
Health service delivery
Fitness to practise (FTP)
Student support
FTP concerns
Practising profession
Health and wellbeing
Summary Fitness to practise (FTP) is fundamental to health professional education and health service delivery, impacting on both practitioner and client wellbeing. Literature exploring FTP support policies primarily identifies retrospective student support and management. This study describes student perceptions of an innovative FTP policy which supports students and staff to proactively identify FTP management strategies prior to entering the clinical environment. Forty-nine final year physiotherapy students were surveyed regarding their perceptions of self-declaring FTP. Ordinal data from Likert scales were reported using descriptive statistics. Thematic analysis was undertaken for open text responses. The response rate was 88%. Forty-two percent of students stated that they had experienced FTP concerns during the course. Concerns included physical and mental impairment and clinical competence issues. The majority of students (80%) indicated that they were “comfortable” or “very comfortable” in self-declaring FTP issues. Confidentiality, positive relationships with staff and a supportive environment enhanced likelihood of declaration. Eight students (19%) met with university staff to develop management strategies and all rated these meetings as “helpful” or “very helpful.” Students had positive perceptions of self-declaring their FTP to enable early development of management strategies. This strategy successfully navigates sensitive ethicolegal issues, empowering students to take responsibility for their own FTP.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2014/578649
Field of Research 130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy
130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 939902 Education and Training Theory and Methodology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Kristin Lo et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092790

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 7 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 03 Apr 2017, 14:28:46 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.