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Interventions to reduce the stigma of eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Doley, Joanna R., Hart, Laura M., Stukas, Arthur A., Petrovic, Katja, Bouguettaya, Ayoub and Paxton, Susan J. 2017, Interventions to reduce the stigma of eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis, International journal of eating disorders, vol. 50, no. 3, Special Issue on Evidence-Based Advocacy and Strategic Science in Eating Disorders, pp. 210-230, doi: 10.1002/eat.22691.

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Title Interventions to reduce the stigma of eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Doley, Joanna R.
Hart, Laura M.
Stukas, Arthur A.
Petrovic, Katja
Bouguettaya, Ayoub
Paxton, Susan J.
Journal name International journal of eating disorders
Volume number 50
Issue number 3
Season Special Issue on Evidence-Based Advocacy and Strategic Science in Eating Disorders
Start page 210
End page 230
Total pages 21
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 1098-108X
Keyword(s) eating disorders
interventions
meta-analysis
narrative review
stigma
Summary Stigma is a problem for individuals with eating disorders (EDs), forming a barrier to disclosure and help-seeking. Interventions to reduce ED stigma may help remove these barriers; however, it is not known which strategies (e.g., explaining etiology to reduce blame, contact with a person with an ED, or educating about ED) are effective in reducing stigma and related outcomes. This review described effectiveness of intervention strategies, and identified gaps in the literature. A search of four databases was performed using the terms (eating disorder* OR bulimi* OR anorexi* OR binge-eating disorder) AND (stigma* OR stereotyp* OR beliefs OR negative attitudes) AND (program OR experiment OR intervention OR education), with additional texts sought through LISTSERVs. Two raters screened papers, extracted data, and assessed quality. Stigma reduction strategies and study characteristics were examined in critical narrative synthesis. Exploratory meta-analysis compared the effects of biological and sociocultural explanations of EDs on attitudinal stigma. Eighteen papers were eligible for narrative synthesis, with four also eligible for inclusion in a meta-analysis. Biological explanations reduced stigma relative to other explanations, including sociocultural explanations in meta-analysis (g = .47, p < .001). Combined education and contact interventions improved stigma relative to control groups or over time. Most studies examined Anorexia Nervosa (AN) stigma and had mostly female, undergraduate participants. Despite apparent effectiveness, research should verify that biological explanations do not cause unintentional harm. Future research should evaluate in vivo contact, directly compare education and contact strategies, and aim to generalize findings across community populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/eat.22691
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Wiley Periodicals
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092832

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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