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Nurses' perceptions of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a qualitative descriptive study

Roberts, Shelley, McInnes, Elizabeth, Wallis, Marianne, Bucknall, Tracey, Banks, Merrilyn and Chaboyer, Wendy 2016, Nurses' perceptions of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a qualitative descriptive study, BMC nursing, vol. 15, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12912-016-0188-9.

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Title Nurses' perceptions of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a qualitative descriptive study
Author(s) Roberts, Shelley
McInnes, Elizabeth
Wallis, Marianne
Bucknall, TraceyORCID iD for Bucknall, Tracey orcid.org/0000-0001-9089-3583
Banks, Merrilyn
Chaboyer, Wendy
Journal name BMC nursing
Volume number 15
Article ID 64
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1472-6955
Keyword(s) care bundle
evidence-based practice
implementation science
knowledge translation
nurses
patient engagement
patient participation
pressure injury prevention
pressure ulcer prevention
process evaluation
Summary BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcer prevention is a critical patient safety indicator for acute care hospitals. An innovative pressure ulcer prevention care bundle targeting patient participation in their care was recently tested in a cluster randomised trial in eight Australian hospitals. Understanding nurses' perspectives of such an intervention is imperative when interpreting results and translating evidence into practice. As part of a process evaluation for the main trial, this study assessed nurses' perceptions of the usefulness and impact of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle intervention on clinical practice.

METHODS: This qualitative descriptive study involved semi-structured interviews with nursing staff at four Australian hospitals that were intervention sites for a cluster randomised trial testing a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Four to five participants were purposively sampled at each site. A trained interviewer used a semi-structured interview guide to question participants about their perceptions of the care bundle. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

RESULTS: Eighteen nurses from four hospitals participated in the study. Nurses' perceptions of the intervention are described in five themes: 1) Awareness of the pressure ulcer prevention care bundle and its similarity to current practice; 2) Improving awareness, communication and participation with the pressure ulcer prevention care bundle; 3) Appreciating the positive aspects of patient participation in care; 4) Perceived barriers to engaging patients in the pressure ulcer prevention care bundle; and 5) Partnering with nursing staff to facilitate pressure ulcer prevention care bundle implementation.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, nurses found the care bundle feasible and acceptable. They identified a number of benefits from the bundle, including improved communication, awareness and participation in pressure ulcer prevention care among patients and staff. However, nurses thought the care bundle was not appropriate or effective for all patients, such as those who were cognitively impaired. Perceived enablers to implementation of the bundle included facilitation through effective communication and dissemination of evidence about the care bundle; strong leadership and ability to influence staff behaviour; and simplicity of the care bundle.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12912-016-0188-9
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092864

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.