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Evaluation of pollutant removal efficiency of a bioretention basin and implications for stormwater management in tropical cities

Wang, Jia, Chua, Lloyd HC and Shanahan, Peter 2017, Evaluation of pollutant removal efficiency of a bioretention basin and implications for stormwater management in tropical cities, Environmental science: water research and technology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 78-91, doi: 10.1039/c6ew00285d.

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Title Evaluation of pollutant removal efficiency of a bioretention basin and implications for stormwater management in tropical cities
Author(s) Wang, Jia
Chua, Lloyd HCORCID iD for Chua, Lloyd HC orcid.org/0000-0003-2523-3735
Shanahan, Peter
Journal name Environmental science: water research and technology
Volume number 3
Issue number 1
Start page 78
End page 91
Total pages 14
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2053-1400
2053-1419
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physical Sciences
Engineering, Environmental
Environmental Sciences
Water Resources
Engineering
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Summary Non-point source pollution is a prevalent problem throughout the world. Bioretention basins have been deployed worldwide to treat stormwater runoff and alleviate eutrophication in downstream water resources. However, basin performance in the tropics is poorly understood. Given the distinctly different rainfall-runoff characteristics of tropical climates, whether basins that are built according to temperate design guidelines are effective is questionable. There have been no field studies based on continuous, high-resolution, long-term monitoring in the tropics. In this study, 96 storms were monitored in the first bioretention basin in Singapore. Of these, flow measurements were made during 80 events and samples were collected and analyzed for 15 water quality parameters (including nitrogen and phosphorus species, total suspended solids, and chemical oxygen demand) during six events. The mean removal rates were 25%, 46%, and 53% for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total suspended solids respectively. Results show that a lack of storage capacity and resulting high overflow reduce pollutant removal efficiency for high-rainfall-depth events. The transition from efficient to non-efficient removal occurs at a rainfall depth between 10 and 30 mm. Low EMC (event mean concentration) and weak first flush as a result of frequent and intense rainfall in the tropics also contribute to low removal rate. The results suggest a need to revise bioretention basin design guidelines for the tropics to be based on WQV or WQD (water quality volume or depth) instead of ARI (average recurrence interval). A larger basin volume (WQD between 10 to 30 mm) is recommended.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c6ew00285d
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092897

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.