You are not logged in.

The use of self-report exposure measures among novice motorcyclists: appropriateness and best practice recommendations

Sakashita, Chika, Senserrick, Teresa, Boufous, Soufiane, de Rome, Liz, Elkington, Jane and Ivers, Rebecca 2014, The use of self-report exposure measures among novice motorcyclists: appropriateness and best practice recommendations, Traffic injury prevention, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 491-500, doi: 10.1080/15389588.2013.837576.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The use of self-report exposure measures among novice motorcyclists: appropriateness and best practice recommendations
Author(s) Sakashita, Chika
Senserrick, Teresa
Boufous, Soufiane
de Rome, LizORCID iD for de Rome, Liz orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-6022
Elkington, Jane
Ivers, Rebecca
Journal name Traffic injury prevention
Volume number 15
Issue number 5
Start page 491
End page 500
Total pages 10
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1538-9588
1538-957X
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Automobile Driving
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motorcycles
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Urbanization
Victoria
Young Adult
Summary OBJECTIVES: While self-report methods to collect exposure information have large practical advantages in many research contexts, little research has specifically investigated the reliability and validity of motorcyclists' self-reported exposure. The present study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of different self-report exposure measures and to provide recommendations on best practice self-report riding exposure questions. METHODS: The reliability and validity of different self-report exposure measures were examined amongst novice motorcyclists through t-tests, Bland Altman plots, coefficients of variation, and correlations. RESULTS: The most valid and reliable data was provided when riding exposure was asked for the current average week rather than earlier and longer periods, and in units of time rather than distance or number of trips. The greater reliability of riding exposure found amongst commuting and rural riders compared to recreational and metropolitan riders respectively and at the second interview compared to the first suggests that factors such as riding purposes, geographical locations, and riding experience can contribute to measurement error. CONCLUSIONS: If self-reported odometer readings are used, questions on whether the respondents share their own bike or ride more than one bike, and a built-in process to ensure respondents report the exact odometer reading on their bike are recommended. It is recommended that self-report riding exposure questions ask about the hours of riding for the current average week, and data on riding purposes, locations, and experience are also collected.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/15389588.2013.837576
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
0902 Automotive Engineering
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092964

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 6 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 04 Apr 2017, 15:23:33 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.