You are not logged in.

The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire: psychometric properties and application amongst novice riders in Australia

Sakashita, Chika, Senserrick, Teresa, Lo, Serigne, Boufous, Soufiane, de Rome, Liz and Ivers, R 2014, The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire: psychometric properties and application amongst novice riders in Australia, Transportation research part F: traffic psychology and behaviour, vol. 22, pp. 126-139, doi: 10.1016/j.trf.2013.10.005.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire: psychometric properties and application amongst novice riders in Australia
Author(s) Sakashita, Chika
Senserrick, Teresa
Lo, Serigne
Boufous, Soufiane
de Rome, LizORCID iD for de Rome, Liz orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-6022
Ivers, R
Journal name Transportation research part F: traffic psychology and behaviour
Volume number 22
Start page 126
End page 139
Total pages 14
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-01
ISSN 1369-8478
Keyword(s) Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire
validity
reliability
motorcycle crash
traffic offence
Summary The Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire (MRBQ) was developed to measure behavioral factors influencing motorcyclists' crash risk including errors and violations as well as the use of motorcycle safety equipment via self-report. The aims of the present study were to (1) examine the previously examined psychometric properties of the MRBQ including the factor structure, internal consistency, and predictive validity in terms of self-reported crashes amongst experienced riders in the UK and Turkey; (2) examine the psychometric properties of the MRBQ not yet examined, including its stability, content validity, and predictive validity in terms of police-recorded crashes and offences as well as self-reported near crashes and crashes; and (3) assess the applicability of the MRBQ to a population of novice riders in Australia, to whom the MRBQ has not been applied to date. Novice riders (N = 1305) in the state of Victoria, Australia participated in the present study. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the present data did not fit with the previously found factor models in experienced riders in the UK and Turkey. Principal axis factoring was performed to respecify the MRBQ factor model amongst novice riders and revealed four scales: errors; speed violations; stunts; and protective gear. The insufficient internal consistency, stability, content and predictive validity demonstrated by the MRBQ in the present study and some inconsistencies amongst the three MRBQ studies suggest that the development and refinement of the MRBQ items are required before wider use of the MRBQ instrument, especially amongst novice riders. Possible causes of the limited reliability and validity of the current MRBQ are discussed to inform further development and refinement of the items, thereby making the MRBQ more useful in future research to understand and evaluate riders' behaviors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2013.10.005
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
1701 Psychology
1507 Transportation And Freight Services
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092966

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 33 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 04 Apr 2017, 15:23:48 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.