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Single- versus multi-vehicle bicycle road crashes in Victoria, Australia

Boufous, Soufiane, de Rome, Liz, Senserrick, Teresa and Ivers, Rebecca Q. 2013, Single- versus multi-vehicle bicycle road crashes in Victoria, Australia, Injury prevention, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 358-362, doi: 10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040630.

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Title Single- versus multi-vehicle bicycle road crashes in Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Boufous, Soufiane
de Rome, LizORCID iD for de Rome, Liz orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-6022
Senserrick, Teresa
Ivers, Rebecca Q.
Journal name Injury prevention
Volume number 19
Issue number 5
Start page 358
End page 362
Total pages 5
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-10
ISSN 1475-5785
Keyword(s) Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Bicycling
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Victoria
Wounds and Injuries
Young Adult
Summary The aim of the study is to compare trends, circumstances and outcomes of single- versus multi-vehicle bicycle on-road crashes in Victoria, Australia, through the analysis of police records and hospital admissions between January 2004 and December 2008. The results show that over 80% of on-road single-vehicle bicycle crashes occurred as a result of the cyclist losing control of the bicycle with the remainder involving collisions with objects. Compared with multi-vehicle crashes, single-vehicle crashes were more likely to occur in the dark, in wet conditions and in rural areas. Over half of the cyclists hospitalised as result of on-road crashes were injured in single-vehicle crashes and this proportion seems to be increasing over time. Single-vehicle crashes were associated with hospitalised injuries as severe as those resulting from multivehicle crashes. The findings highlight the significant burden of serious injury associated with single-vehicle bicycle road crashes. Further research is needed to investigate in greater detail the risk factors of these crashes and the effectiveness of countermeasures to reduce their burden.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040630
Field of Research 099999 Engineering not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BMJ Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092968

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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