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Polymerase discordance in novel swine influenza H3N2v constellations is tolerated in swine but not human respiratory epithelial cells

Powell, Joshua D., Dlugolenski, Daniel, Nagy, Tamas, Gabbard, Jon, Lee, Christopher, Tompkins, Stephen M. and Tripp, Ralph A. 2014, Polymerase discordance in novel swine influenza H3N2v constellations is tolerated in swine but not human respiratory epithelial cells, PLoS one, vol. 9, no. 10, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110264.

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Title Polymerase discordance in novel swine influenza H3N2v constellations is tolerated in swine but not human respiratory epithelial cells
Author(s) Powell, Joshua D.
Dlugolenski, Daniel
Nagy, Tamas
Gabbard, Jon
Lee, Christopher
Tompkins, Stephen M.
Tripp, Ralph A.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 9
Issue number 10
Article ID e110264
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Bronchi
Cell Differentiation
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
Dogs
Epithelial Cells
Female
Ferrets
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Reassortant Viruses
Species Specificity
Swine
Virus Replication
Summary Swine-origin H3N2v, a variant of H3N2 influenza virus, is a concern for novel reassortment with circulating pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1pdm09) in swine because this can lead to the emergence of a novel pandemic virus. In this study, the reassortment prevalence of H3N2v with H1N1pdm09 was determined in swine cells. Reassortants evaluated showed that the H1N1pdm09 polymerase (PA) segment occurred within swine H3N2 with ∼ 80% frequency. The swine H3N2-human H1N1pdm09 PA reassortant (swH3N2-huPA) showed enhanced replication in swine cells, and was the dominant gene constellation. Ferrets infected with swH3N2-huPA had increased lung pathogenicity compared to parent viruses; however, swH3N2-huPA replication in normal human bronchoepithelial cells was attenuated - a feature linked to expression of IFN-β and IFN-λ genes in human but not swine cells. These findings indicate that emergence of novel H3N2v influenza constellations require more than changes in the viral polymerase complex to overcome barriers to cross-species transmission. Additionally, these findings reveal that while the ferret model is highly informative for influenza studies, slight differences in pathogenicity may not necessarily be indicative of human outcomes after infection.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0110264
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092984

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.