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Antiviral responses by swine primary bronchoepithelial cells are limited compared to human bronchoepithelial cells following influenza virus infection

Hauser, Mary J., Dlugolenski, Daniel, Culhane, Marie R., Wentworth, David E., Tompkins, S. Mark and Tripp, Ralph A. 2013, Antiviral responses by swine primary bronchoepithelial cells are limited compared to human bronchoepithelial cells following influenza virus infection, PLoS one, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070251.

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Title Antiviral responses by swine primary bronchoepithelial cells are limited compared to human bronchoepithelial cells following influenza virus infection
Author(s) Hauser, Mary J.
Dlugolenski, Daniel
Culhane, Marie R.
Wentworth, David E.
Tompkins, S. Mark
Tripp, Ralph A.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 7
Article ID e70251
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Animals
Bronchi
Cells, Cultured
Epithelial Cells
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Influenza, Human
Male
Orthomyxoviridae
Orthomyxoviridae Infections
Primary Cell Culture
Respiratory Mucosa
Swine
Swine Diseases
Summary Swine generate reassortant influenza viruses because they can be simultaneously infected with avian and human influenza; however, the features that restrict influenza reassortment in swine and human hosts are not fully understood. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) act as the first line of defense against influenza virus infection of respiratory epithelium. To determine if human and swine have different capacities to mount an antiviral response the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and normal swine bronchial epithelial (NSBE) cells was evaluated following infection with human (H3N2), swine (H1N1), and avian (H5N3, H5N2, H5N1) influenza A viruses. Expression of IFNλ and ISGs were substantially higher in NHBE cells compared to NSBE cells following H5 avian influenza virus infection compared to human or swine influenza virus infection. This effect was associated with reduced H5 avian influenza virus replication in human cells at late times post infection. Further, RIG-I expression was lower in NSBE cells compared to NHBE cells suggesting reduced virus sensing. Together, these studies identify key differences in the antiviral response between human and swine respiratory epithelium alluding to differences that may govern influenza reassortment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0070251
Field of Research 110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092986

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.