You are not logged in.

Gambling problems in treatment for affective disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

Cowlishaw, S., Hakes, J.K. and Dowling, Nicki A. 2016, Gambling problems in treatment for affective disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), Journal of affective disorders, vol. 202, pp. 110-114, doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.05.023.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Gambling problems in treatment for affective disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
Author(s) Cowlishaw, S.
Hakes, J.K.
Dowling, Nicki A.
Journal name Journal of affective disorders
Volume number 202
Start page 110
End page 114
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-09-15
ISSN 0165-0327
1573-2517
Keyword(s) affective disorders
anxiety disorders
treatment-seeking
problem gambling
population sample
comorbidity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Clinical Neurology
Psychiatry
Neurosciences & Neurology
SUBSTANCE USE TREATMENT
MOOD DISORDERS
PREVALENCE
METAANALYSIS
RELIABILITY
OUTPATIENTS
ANXIETY
SAMPLE
IV
Summary BACKGROUND: Gambling problems co-occur frequently with other psychiatric difficulties and may complicate treatment for affective disorders. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of gambling problems in a U. S. representative sample reporting treatment for mood problems or anxiety.

METHODS: n=3007 respondents indicating past-year treatment for affective disorders were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Weighted prevalence estimates were produced and regression analyses examined correlates of gambling problems.

RESULTS: Rates of lifetime and past-year problem gambling (3+DSM-IV symptoms) were 3.1% (95% CI=2.4-4.0%) and 1.4% (95% CI=0.9-2.1%), respectively, in treatment for any disorder. Rates of lifetime problem gambling ranged from 3.1% (95% CI=2.3-4.3%) for depression to 5.4% (95% CI=3.2-9.0%) for social phobia. Past-year conditions ranged from 0.9% (95% CI=0.4-2.1%) in dysthymia to 2.4% (95% CI=1.1-5.3%) in social phobia. Higher levels were observed when considering a spectrum of severity (including 'at-risk' gambling), with 8.9% (95% CI=7.7-10.2%) of respondents indicating a history of any gambling problems (1+ DSM-IV symptoms). Lifetime gambling problems predicted interpersonal problems and financial difficulties, and marijuana use, but not alcohol use, mental or physical health, and healthcare utilisation.

LIMITATIONS: Data were collected in 2001-02 and were cross-sectional.

CONCLUSIONS: Gambling problems occur at non-trivial rates in treatment for affective disorders and have mainly psychosocial implications. The findings indicate scope for initiatives to identify and respond to gambling problems across a continuum of severity in treatment for affective disorders.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2016.05.023
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092992

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 14 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 04 Apr 2017, 15:35:40 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.