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Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children?

Downing, Katherine L., Hinkley, Trina, Salmon, Jo, Hnatiuk, Jill A. and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2017, Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children?, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4195-x.

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Title Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children?
Author(s) Downing, Katherine L.
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hnatiuk, Jill A.
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 285
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-03-29
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) sedentary behaviour
sedentary time
screen time
preschool children
paediatric
accelerometry
television viewing
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
MEASURED PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
YOUNG-CHILDREN
INTERNATIONAL SURVEY
OBJECTIVE MEASURES
EARLY-CHILDHOOD
BEHAVIOR
HEALTH
ASSOCIATIONS
OVERWEIGHT
HOME
Summary Background
Preschool children can spend up to 12 h a day in sedentary time and few meet current recommendations for screen time. Little is known about ecological correlates that could be targeted to decrease specific versus total sedentary behaviour. This study examined whether the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool boys and girls.

Methods

Parents participating in the HAPPY Study in 2008/09 in Melbourne, Australia reported their child’s usual screen time and potential individual, social and physical environment correlates. Children wore ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers for eight days to objectively assess sedentary time (<100 counts.min−1). Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed, stratified by sex and controlling for child age, preschool/childcare attendance and clustering by centre of recruitment. Correlates significantly associated with screen time or sedentary time in individual models (p < 0.05) were included in final combined models.

Results

Children were sedentary for 301.1 (SD 34.1) minutes/day and spent 108.5 (SD 69.6) minutes/day in screen time. There were no sex differences in screen or sedentary time. In the final models, sleep duration was inversely associated with girls’ sedentary time and boys’ screen time. The only other consistent correlates for boys and girls were parental self-efficacy to limit screen time and screen time rules, which were inversely associated with screen time for both sexes. Parents reporting that they get bored watching their child play was inversely associated and maternal television viewing was positively associated with boys’ screen time. Paternal age was positively associated with boys’ sedentary time. Maternal ethnicity was inversely associated and paternal education, child preferences for sedentary behaviour, and parental concerns about child’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour were positively associated with girls’ screen time.

Conclusions

The modifiable correlates of total sedentary and screen time identified in this study could be targeted in interventions to reduce these behaviours. With correlates differing for screen and sedentary time, and between boys and girls, interventions may also benefit from including behaviour- and sex-specific strategies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4195-x
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30092994

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.