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Fitter women did not have attenuated hemodynamic responses to psychological stress compared with age-matched women with lower levels of fitness

Jayasinghe, Sisitha U., Torres, Susan J., Hussein, Mais, Fraser, Steve F., Lambert, Gavin W. and Turner, Anne I. 2017, Fitter women did not have attenuated hemodynamic responses to psychological stress compared with age-matched women with lower levels of fitness, PLoS one, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169746.

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Title Fitter women did not have attenuated hemodynamic responses to psychological stress compared with age-matched women with lower levels of fitness
Author(s) Jayasinghe, Sisitha U.
Torres, Susan J.ORCID iD for Torres, Susan J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
Hussein, Mais
Fraser, Steve F.ORCID iD for Fraser, Steve F. orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-9619
Lambert, Gavin W.
Turner, Anne I.ORCID iD for Turner, Anne I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Article ID e0169746
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-01-12
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS
PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS
AEROBIC EXERCISE
BLOOD-PRESSURE
MENSTRUAL-CYCLE
CARDIOVASCULAR REACTIVITY
PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSE
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
HEART-RATE
TRAINING-PROGRAM
Summary According to the 'cross stressor adaptation hypothesis', regular exercise acts as a buffer against the detrimental effects of stress. Nevertheless, evidence that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness moderate hemodynamic responses to acute psychological stress is inconclusive, especially in women. Women aged 30-50 years (in the mid-follicular phase of the menstrual cycle) with higher (n = 17) and lower (n = 17) levels of fitness were subjected to a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Continuous, non-invasive measurements were made of beat-to-beat, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), maximum slope, pulse interval (PI) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Maximal oxygen consumption was significantly (p<0.001) higher in the 'higher fit' women. Lower fit women had higher fasting glucose, resting heart rate, waist to hip ratios and elevated serum triglyceride and cholesterol/ HDL ratios compared with higher fit women (p<0.05 for all). While all measured parameters (for both groups)displayed significant (p<0.001) responses to the TSST, only HR, PI and LVET differed significantly between higher and lower fit women (p<0.001 for all) with the higher fit women having the larger response in each case. It was also found that higher fit women had significantly shorter time to recovery for maximum slope compared with the lower fit women. These findings provide little support for the notion that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness result in lower cardiovascular responsivity to psychological stress in women but may indicate that lower fit women have blunted responses to stress.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0169746
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093035

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.