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Beverage consumption among U.S. children aged 0-24 months: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Grimes, Carley A., Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A. and Nicklas, Theresa A. 2017, Beverage consumption among U.S. children aged 0-24 months: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3390/nu9030264.

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Title Beverage consumption among U.S. children aged 0-24 months: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
Author(s) Grimes, Carley A.ORCID iD for Grimes, Carley A. orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.ORCID iD for Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A. orcid.org/0000-0002-6533-7945
Nicklas, Theresa A.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Article ID 264
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-03-13
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) NHANES
infant
toddler
beverage intake
water intake
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
FEEDING INFANTS
JUICE CONSUMPTION
CHILDHOOD OBESITY
NUTRIENT INTAKE
UNITED-STATES
DIET QUALITY
TODDLERS
PATTERNS
ASSOCIATION
DISPARITIES
Summary Data on beverage consumption patterns in early life are limited. The aim of this study was to describe beverage consumption by sociodemographic characteristics, along with water intake and sources of water among U.S. children aged 0–24 months. Data from 2740 children in the 2005–2012 NHANES were analysed. Food intake was determined via one 24-h dietary recall. Beverages were categorised according to What We Eat In America groups. Poverty–Income ratio was used to define household income. During infancy (0–5.9 months and 6–11.9 months) infant formulas were the most commonly consumed beverage, 74.1% and 78.6% of children consuming, respectively. Comparatively fewer children, 41.6% and 24.3%, consumed breast milk. In toddlers (12–24 months), the most commonly consumed beverages were plain milk (83.6% of children consuming), water (68.6%), 100% fruit juice (51.8%) and sweetened beverages (31.2%). Non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American children were more likely to consume sweetened beverages, 100% fruit juice and infant formula than Non-Hispanic white children. Children from lower income households were more likely to consume sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice and less likely to consume breast milk than children from higher income households. Total water intake increased with age and the contribution of water from food and beverage sources was ~20% and ~80% for all children, respectively. Disparities in beverage consumption by race/ethnicity and income level are apparent in early life.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9030264
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093072

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.