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'Please don't call me Mister': patient preferences of how they are addressed and their knowledge of their treating medical team in an Australian hospital

Parsons, Shaun R, Hughes, Andrew J and Friedman, N Deborah 2016, 'Please don't call me Mister': patient preferences of how they are addressed and their knowledge of their treating medical team in an Australian hospital, BMJ open, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008473.

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Title 'Please don't call me Mister': patient preferences of how they are addressed and their knowledge of their treating medical team in an Australian hospital
Author(s) Parsons, Shaun R
Hughes, Andrew J
Friedman, N Deborah
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Article ID e008473
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-01-01
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Names
Patient Care Team
Patient Preference
Physician-Patient Relations
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
DOCTORS
SATISFACTION
PHYSICIANS
NAME
Summary OBJECTIVES: To investigate how patients prefer to be addressed by healthcare providers and to assess their knowledge of their attending medical team's identity in an Australian Hospital.

SETTING: Single-centre, large tertiary hospital in Australia.

PARTICIPANTS: 300 inpatients were included in the survey. Patients were selected in a sequential, systematic and whole-ward manner. Participants were excluded with significant cognitive impairment, non-English speaking, under the age of 18 years or were too acutely unwell to participate. The sample demographic was predominately an older population of Anglo-Saxon background.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients preferred mode of address from healthcare providers including first name, title and second name, abbreviated first name or another name. Whether patients disliked formal address of title and second name. Secondarily, patient knowledge of their attending medical team members name and role and if correct, what position within the medical hierarchy they held.

RESULTS: Over 99% of patients prefer informal address with greater than one-third having a preference to being called a name other than their legal first name. 57% of patients were unable to correctly name a single member of their attending medical team.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings support patient preference of informal address; however, healthcare providers cannot assume that a documented legal first name is preferred by the patient. Patient knowledge of their attending medical team is poor and suggests current introduction practices are insufficient.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008473
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093150

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.