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Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a narrative review to inform dietetics practice

Marx, Wofgang, Kiss, Nicole, McCarthy, Alexandra L., McKavanagh, Dan and Isenring, Liz 2016, Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a narrative review to inform dietetics practice, Journal of the academy of nutrition and dietetics, vol. 116, no. 5, pp. 819-827, doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2015.10.020.

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Title Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a narrative review to inform dietetics practice
Author(s) Marx, Wofgang
Kiss, NicoleORCID iD for Kiss, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0002-6476-9834
McCarthy, Alexandra L.
McKavanagh, Dan
Isenring, Liz
Journal name Journal of the academy of nutrition and dietetics
Volume number 116
Issue number 5
Start page 819
End page 827
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 2212-2672
2212-2680
Keyword(s) nausea
vomiting
chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)
oncology
nutrition
Antineoplastic Agents
Complementary Therapies
Dietary Proteins
Dietetics
Ginger
Humans
Malnutrition
Meals
Neoplasms
Nutritional Status
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Factors
Treatment Outcome
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
PATIENTS RECEIVING RADIOTHERAPY
HIGHLY EMETOGENIC CHEMOTHERAPY
SUBJECTIVE GLOBAL ASSESSMENT
COLORECTAL-CANCER PATIENTS
ANTIEMETIC TREATMENT
ANTICIPATORY NAUSEA
NUTRITIONAL-STATUS
BREAST-CANCER
ONCOLOGY PATIENTS
Summary Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are common symptoms experienced by patients with cancer that influence nutrition. They exert a detrimental effect on dietary intake, risk of malnutrition, and quality of life. Whereas CINV are primarily managed with medication, nutrition and dietetics practitioners play an important role in the management of CINV-related complications such as reduced dietary intake. This review discusses the burden of nausea and vomiting that patients with cancer can experience, including the effect on quality of life, nutritional status, and treatment outcomes. Implications for dietetics practice include the need to explore the nature of reported symptoms, identify predisposing risk factors, and to consider the use of a variety of interventions that are individualized to a patient's symptoms. There are little clinical data regarding effective dietetic interventions for nausea and vomiting. In summary, this review discusses dietetics-related issues surrounding CINV, including the pathophysiology, risk factors, prevalence, and both pharmacologic and dietetic treatment options.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2015.10.020
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093234

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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