You are not logged in.

Potential economic impact on hospitalisations of the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) ketamine randomised controlled trial

McCaffrey, Nikki, Hardy, Janet, Fazekas, Belinda, Agar, Meera, Devilee, Linda, Rowett, Debra and Currow, David 2016, Potential economic impact on hospitalisations of the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) ketamine randomised controlled trial, Australian health review, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 100-105, doi: 10.1071/AH15012.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Potential economic impact on hospitalisations of the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) ketamine randomised controlled trial
Author(s) McCaffrey, NikkiORCID iD for McCaffrey, Nikki orcid.org/0000-0003-3684-3723
Hardy, Janet
Fazekas, Belinda
Agar, Meera
Devilee, Linda
Rowett, Debra
Currow, David
Journal name Australian health review
Volume number 40
Issue number 1
Start page 100
End page 105
Total pages 6
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Keyword(s) Analgesics
Chronic Disease
Cost Savings
Hospitalization
Humans
Ketamine
Neoplasms
Pain Management
Palliative Care
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Summary OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to estimate the potential healthcare cost savings associated with reduced prescribing of subcutaneous ketamine for the treatment of chronic cancer pain after publication of the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) ketamine randomised controlled trial (RCT), to provide further reasons to modify ketamine prescribing practice in this setting.

METHODS: Potential cost savings in this setting were estimated from a health system perspective using a 1-year impact model. The model was populated with estimates derived using an epidemiological approach informed by morbidity and prevalence data, the PaCCSC feasibility study, ketamine RCT and national ketamine utilisation survey results, as well as clinical opinion.

RESULTS: The total estimated annual hospitalisation costs associated with subcutaneous ketamine prescribing were A$3 899 600 (2605 bed-days). A 17% reduction in ketamine prescribing lowered hospitalisation costs to A$3 236 668 (2162 bed-days), a reduction of A$662 932 (443 bed-days) because of reduced in-patient stays associated with ketamine toxicity and prescribing process.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings from the modelled impact analysis suggest that dissemination of the PaCCSC ketamine RCT results may have saved the Australian healthcare system approximately A$663 000 in annual hospitalisation costs and freed up 443 in-patient bed-days, although there was high uncertainty within the study. Wider dissemination over time and targeted, local de-adoption strategies could result in further savings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/AH15012
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1605 Policy And Administration
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, AHHA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093392

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 17 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 05 Apr 2017, 13:01:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.