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An empirical comparison of the OPQoL-Brief, EQ-5D-3L and ASCOT in a community dwelling population of older people

Kaambwa, Billingsley, Gill, Liz, McCaffrey, Nikki, Lancsar, Emily, Cameron, Ian D., Crotty, Maria, Gray, Len and Ratcliffe, Julie 2015, An empirical comparison of the OPQoL-Brief, EQ-5D-3L and ASCOT in a community dwelling population of older people, Health and quality of life outcomes, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1186/s12955-015-0357-7.

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Title An empirical comparison of the OPQoL-Brief, EQ-5D-3L and ASCOT in a community dwelling population of older people
Author(s) Kaambwa, Billingsley
Gill, Liz
McCaffrey, NikkiORCID iD for McCaffrey, Nikki orcid.org/0000-0003-3684-3723
Lancsar, Emily
Cameron, Ian D.
Crotty, Maria
Gray, Len
Ratcliffe, Julie
Journal name Health and quality of life outcomes
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Article ID 164
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-09-30
ISSN 1477-7525
Keyword(s) EQ-5D-3 L
OPQoL-Brief
ASCOT
convergent validity
level of agreement
community-dwelling
older people
Summary Background
This study examined the relationships between a newly developed older person-specific non-preference-based quality of life (QoL) instrument (Older People’s Quality of Life brief questionnaire (OPQoL-brief)) and two generic preference-based instruments (the EQ-5D-3L Level (EQ-5D-3 L) and the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT) in a community-dwelling population of Australian older people receiving aged care services.

Methods
We formulated hypotheses about the convergent validity between the instruments (examined by Wilcoxon-Mann Whitney, Kruskal Wallis and Spearman’s correlation tests) and levels of agreement (assessed using intra class correlation (ICC) and modified Bland-Altman plots based on normalized Z EQ-5D-3 L and ASCOT utilities and OPQoL-Brief summary scores).

Results
The utilities/summary scores for 87 participants (aged 65–93 years) were moderately but positively correlated. Moderate convergent validity was evident for a number of instrument dimensions with the strongest relationship (r = 0.57) between ‘enjoy life’ (OPQoL-Brief) and ‘social contact’ (ASCOT). The overall ICC was 0.54 and Bland-Altman scatter plots showed 3–6 % of normalized Z-scores were outside the 95 % limits of agreement suggesting moderate agreement between all three instruments (agreement highest between the OPQoL-Brief and the ASCOT).

Conclusions
Our results suggest that the OPQoL-Brief, the ASCOT and the EQ-5D_3L are suitable for measuring quality of life outcomes in community-dwelling populations of older people. Given the different constructs underpinning these instruments, we recommend that choice of instrument should be guided by the context in which the instruments are being applied. Currently, the OPQoL-Brief is not suitable for use in cost-utility analyses as it is not preference-based. Given their different perspectives, we recommend that both the ASCOT and the EQ-5D are applied simultaneously to capture broader aspects of quality of life and health status within cost-utility analyses within the aged care sector. Future research directed towards the development of a new single preference-based instrument that incorporates both health status and broader aspects of quality of life within quality adjusted life year calculations for older people would be beneficial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12955-015-0357-7
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093396

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.