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Racism and health among urban Aboriginal young people

Priest, Naomi, Paradies, Yin, Stewart, Paul and Luke, Joanne 2011, Racism and health among urban Aboriginal young people, BMC public health, vol. 11, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-568.

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Title Racism and health among urban Aboriginal young people
Author(s) Priest, Naomi
Paradies, YinORCID iD for Paradies, Yin orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-7074
Stewart, Paul
Luke, Joanne
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 11
Article ID 568
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Odds Ratio
Prejudice
Urban Population
Victoria
Young Adult
Summary Background
Racism has been identified as an important determinant of health but few studies have explored associations between racism and health outcomes for Australian Aboriginal young people in urban areas.

Methods

Cross sectional data from participants aged 12-26 years in Wave 1 of the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service's Young People's Project were included in hierarchical logistic regression models. Overall mental health, depression and general health were all considered as outcomes with self-reported racism as the exposure, adjusting for a range of relevant confounders.

Results

Racism was reported by a high proportion (52.3%) of participants in this study. Self-reported racism was significantly associated with poor overall mental health (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.25-5.70, p = 0.01) and poor general health (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.03-4.57, p = 0.04), and marginally associated with increased depression (OR 2.0; 95% CI 0.97-4.09, p = 0.06) in the multivariate models. Number of worries and number of friends were both found to be effect modifiers for the association between self-reported racism and overall mental health. Getting angry at racist remarks was found to mediate the relationship between self-reported racism and general health.

Conclusions

This study highlights the need to acknowledge and address racism as an important determinant of health and wellbeing for Aboriginal young people in urban areas of Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-568
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920301 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Determinants of Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093536

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.