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The modelled cost-effectiveness of cognitive dissonance for the prevention of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in adolescent girls in Australia

Le, LK-D, Barendregt, JJ, Hay, P, Sawyer, SM, Paxton, SJ and Mihalopoulos, Cathrine 2017, The modelled cost-effectiveness of cognitive dissonance for the prevention of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in adolescent girls in Australia, International journal of eating disorders, vol. 50, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1002/eat.22703.

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Title The modelled cost-effectiveness of cognitive dissonance for the prevention of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in adolescent girls in Australia
Author(s) Le, LK-D
Barendregt, JJ
Hay, P
Sawyer, SM
Paxton, SJ
Mihalopoulos, CathrineORCID iD for Mihalopoulos, Cathrine orcid.org/0000-0002-7127-9462
Journal name International journal of eating disorders
Volume number 50
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-03-21
ISSN 1098-108X
Keyword(s) anorexia nervosa
bulimia nervosa
cost-effectiveness
eating disorders
economic evaluation
Social Sciences
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychology, Clinical
Nutrition & Dietetics
Psychiatry
Psychology
EATING-DISORDER PREVENTION
GLOBAL BURDEN
HEALTH
PROGRAM
TRIAL
Summary BACKGROUND: Eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), are prevalent disorders that carry substantial economic and social burden. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the modelled population cost-effectiveness of cognitive dissonance (CD), a school-based preventive intervention for EDs, in the Australian health care context. METHOD: A population-based Markov model was developed to estimate the cost per disability adjusted life-year (DALY) averted by CD relative to no intervention. We modelled the cases of AN and BN that could be prevented over a 10-year time horizon in each study arm and the subsequent reduction in DALYs associated with this. The target population was 15-18 year old secondary school girls with high body-image concerns. This study only considered costs of the health sector providing services and not costs to individuals. Multivariate probabilistic and one-way sensitivity analyses were conducted to test model assumptions. RESULTS: Findings showed that the mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio at base-case for the intervention was $103,980 per DALY averted with none of the uncertainty iterations falling below the threshold of AUD$50,000 per DALY averted. The evaluation was most sensitive to estimates of participant rates with higher rates associated with more favourable results. The intervention would become cost-effective (84% chance) if the effect of the intervention lasted up to 5 years. CONCLUSION: As modelled, school-based CD intervention is not a cost-effective preventive intervention for AN and BN. Given the burden of EDs, understanding how to improve participation rates is an important opportunity for future research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/eat.22703
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
140208 Health Economics
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Wiley Periodicals
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093684

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Population Health
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